Pediatric Primary Care Involvement in End-of-Life Care for Children.

Authors: Lindley LC, Nageswaran S

Source:

Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2017 Mar;34(2):135-141

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationship between pediatric primary care involvement and hospice and home health care use at end of life.
METHODS: California Medicaid data were used to estimate the relationship between pediatric primary care involvement and use of hospice and home health care using generalized estimating equations.
RESULTS: Of the 2037 children who died between 2007 and 2010, 11% used hospice and 23% used home health. Among all children, primary care was not related to hospice use and was associated with home health use, usual source of care (OR = 1.83, P < .05), comprehensive care (OR = 1.60, P < .05), and continuous care (low: OR = 1.49, P < .05; moderate: OR = 2.57, P < .05; high: OR = 2.12, P < .05). Primary care for children aged 15 to 20 years was related to hospice use, usual source of care (OR = 4.06, P < .05) and continuous care (low: OR = 4.92, P < .05; moderate OR = 4.09, P < .05; high OR = 3.92, P < .05). Primary care for children under 5 years was associated with home health use, usual source of care (OR = 2.59, P < .05), comprehensive care (OR = 2.49, P < .05), and continuous care (low: OR = 2.22, P < .05; moderate: OR = 3.64, P < .05; high: OR = 3.62, P < .05). For children aged 6 to 14 years, this association was seen with continuous care (moderate: OR = 2.38, P < .05; high: OR = 2.13, P < .05). Home health for children aged 15 to 20 years was related to continuous care (moderate: OR = 2.32, P < .05).
CONCLUSION: Primary care involvement affected hospice use among older age-groups and home health use among younger age-groups. These findings underscore the need for clinical knowledge about end-of-life care for children of all ages among primary care providers.

PMID:

PubMed:26430133

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