Women who give birth in winter or spring less likely to have postpartum depression

Source: American Society of Anesthesiologists. "Women who give birth in winter or spring less likely to have postpartum depression: Study finds higher gestational age is protective, and not having anesthesia increases risk." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 October 2017.

Women who give birth in winter or spring are less likely than women who deliver in the fall or summer to suffer from postpartum depression suggests a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2017 annual meeting.

The study also found that women who delivered babies at a higher gestational age (further along in their pregnancy) were less likely to develop PPD, and women who did not have anesthesia, such as an epidural, during delivery had an increased risk. The authors said women who did not have anesthesia may have been at an increased risk for PPD because the pain associated with labor may have been traumatizing to the women during delivery, or it’s possible those who declined anesthesia just happened to have intrinsic characteristics that made them more vulnerable to experiencing PPD.

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