Assessing the impact and cost-effectiveness of needle and syringe provision and opioid substitution therapy on hepatitis C transmission among people who inject drugs in the UK: an analysis of pooled data sets and economic modelling

Authors: Platt, L. et Al.

Source: Public Health Research, No. 5.5 Sept 2017

Opiate substitution therapy together with needle/syringe programmes (NSPs) probably reduce the risk of hepatitis C acquisition; and NSPs are likely to be good value for money and even cost saving in some settings.

Background:There is limited evidence of the impact of needle and syringe programmes (NSPs) and opioid substitution therapy (OST) on hepatitis C virus (HCV) incidence among people who inject drugs (PWID), nor have there been any economic evaluations.

Objective(s):To measure (1) the impact of NSP and OST, (2) changes in the extent of provision of both interventions, and (3) costs and cost-effectiveness of NSPs on HCV infection transmission.

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