Factors that influence evidence-based program sustainment for family support providers in child protection services in disadvantaged communities.

Related Articles
Factors that influence evidence-based program sustainment for family support providers in child protection services in disadvantaged communities. Child Abuse Negl. 2017 Jun 10;70:134-145 Authors: Hodge LM, Turner KMT, Sanders MR, Forster M Abstract This paper evaluates program, workplace and process factors associated with implementation and sustainment of an evidence-based parenting support program (EBP) in disadvantaged communities. Correlation analyses and binary logistic regressions were used to assess the associations between key implementation support factors and program implementation (at 18 months) and sustainment (at 36 months) post training with (N=35) Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family support providers using the Triple P - Positive Parenting Program in Indigenous child protection agencies. This study demonstrated that for implementation at 18 months, there was a trend for implementing providers to report higher levels of partnership support, perceived program benefit, workplace support and workplace cohesion. However, the only significant relationship was with partnership support (r=.31 p<0.05), and regression analysis indicated that none of the variables were significant predictors of program implementation. For sustained implementation at 36 months, no relationship was found between sustainment and program characteristics, workplace characteristics, supervision and peer support or sustainability planning. Supportive coaching was the only significant correlate (r=0.46, p<0.01) and predictor [OR=15.63, 95% CI (1.98-123.68), p=0.009] in the program sustainment model. Overall, these findings suggest the need for further exploration of program and workplace variables and provide evidence to consider incorporating partnership support and supportive coaching in real world implementation models to improve the likelihood of EBP implementation and sustainment in Indigenous communities. PMID: 28609693 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Understanding potential uptake of a proposed mHealth program to support caregiver home management of childhood illness in a resource-poor setting: a qualitative evaluation.

Understanding potential uptake of a proposed mHealth program to support caregiver home management of childhood illness in a resource-poor setting: a qualitative evaluation. Mhealth. 2017;3:19 Authors: Calderón TA, Martin H, Volpicelli K, Frasso R, Díaz Arroyo EC, Gozzer E, Buttenheim AM Abstract BACKGROUND: Extensive uptake of mobile phones offers an unprecedented opportunity to improve global healthcare delivery, especially among underserved populations. Mobile health (mHealth) has been increasingly recognized as a promising approach to addressing challenges in global maternal-child health and may play an important role in accelerating progress towards improved outcomes. However, more evidence guiding development of mHealth interventions is needed. The current study explores factors that may support or hinder adoption and use of a proposed mHealth intervention to improve caregiver home management of common childhood illnesses in order to shape program development. METHODS: Elicitation interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 25 mothers recruited from a larger cluster-randomized survey sample in the Cono Norte region of Arequipa, Peru. Interview data were analyzed in Spanish to preserve important cultural nuances. RESULTS: Thematic analysis revealed potential facilitators of and barriers to uptake of the proposed mHealth program. Potential facilitators of caregiver participation include opportunity to engage in two-way communication with healthcare providers, development of instrumental and support knowledge to care for sick children, and healthcare challenges faced in a resource-poor community. Potential barriers include preference for in-person healthcare visits, program cost, text messaging abilities, and concern around program legitimacy. CONCLUSIONS: This study underscores the potential for mHealth to improve global healthcare delivery in the area of maternal-child health. It demonstrates that mHealth interventions can meet the needs of vulnerable populations by offering novel approaches to promoting evidence-based care. This in-depth understanding of factors that may influence participation and use of this proposed mHealth program will help shape development of the intervention in this community. PMID: 28607905 [PubMed - in process]

Long-term pediatrician outcomes of a parent led curriculum in developmental disabilities.

Related Articles
Long-term pediatrician outcomes of a parent led curriculum in developmental disabilities. Res Dev Disabil. 2017 Jan;60:16-23 Authors: Keisling BL, Bishop EA, Kube DA, Roth JM, Palmer FB Abstract Previous research has demonstrated high satisfaction and perceived relevance of Project DOCC (Delivery of Chronic Care), a parent led curriculum in developmental disabilities, across a sample of medical residents. AIMS: The influence of such a training program on the clinical practices and professional activities of these residents once they are established in their careers as physicians, however, has not been studied; this was the aim of the present study. METHODS: An anonymous follow-up survey was designed and disseminated to physicians who participated in Project DOCC during their one-month developmental disabilities rotation as part of their pediatrics or medicine/pediatric residency between 2002 and 2010. Fifty-eight physicians completed the survey. RESULTS: The findings suggest that participation in a parent led curriculum during medical residency had a lasting impact on physicians' relationships with families. Specifically, a majority of the physicians espoused a family-centered approach to care, a sensitivity to the interactional effect that caring for a Child with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN) has on family members, the need for physicians to have a prominent role in community resource coordination, and the importance of an integrated approach to health care provision. CONCLUSIONS: Use of a parent led curriculum as a means to increase the provision of family-centered care by physicians is supported. PMID: 27875781 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Gestational hypertension is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes in adult offspring: the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

Related Articles
Gestational hypertension is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes in adult offspring: the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Mar;216(3):281.e1-281.e7 Authors: Kajantie E, Osmond C, Eriksson JG Abstract BACKGROUND: Women with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes later in life. Offspring born from these hypertensive pregnancies have increased levels of cardiovascular risk factors; whether they are at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes is not known. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the investigation was to study the risk of type 2 diabetes in the adult offspring exposed to maternal preeclampsia or gestational hypertension in utero. STUDY DESIGN: We studied 5335 members of the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, who were born between 1934 and 1944 and who lived in Finland in 1995 when the National Medication Purchase Register was initiated. We ascertained gestational hypertension and preeclampsia according to modern criteria by using maternal and birth records. We defined type 2 diabetes through purchases of antidiabetic medication recorded in the comprehensive National Medication Purchase Register, excluding the 31 subjects who had purchased only insulin. We used Cox regression to assess hazard ratios for type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: A total of 590 men (21.6%) and 433 women (16.9%) had purchased medication for diabetes. The hazard ratio for type 2 diabetes for offspring exposed to any maternal hypertension in pregnancy was 1.13 (95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.29; n = 1780). For maternal gestational hypertension, it was 1.15 (95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.33; n = 1336) and for preeclampsia 0.98 (95% confidence interval, 0.71-1.34; n = 231). For type 2 diabetes with first medication purchase before 62 years, the corresponding hazard ratios were 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.51); 1.28 (95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.58), and 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.84). The hazard ratios were similar when adjusted for birthweight SD score for gestation, length of gestation, maternal body mass index in late pregnancy, height, age, and parity and for childhood or adult socioeconomic position. An increased risk of type 2 diabetes was also associated with low birthweight SD score, independent of the association with gestational hypertension. CONCLUSION: Offspring exposed to maternal gestational hypertension in utero have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in late adult life. This finding underlines the role of the whole spectrum of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy as risk factors of offspring disease throughout life. It also reinforces previous suggestions that adult health care providers should incorporate birth histories when evaluating an individual's risk to develop type 2 diabetes. PMID: 27823919 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Prescription rates of adrenaline auto-injectors for children in UK general practice: a retrospective cohort study.

Related Articles
Prescription rates of adrenaline auto-injectors for children in UK general practice: a retrospective cohort study. Br J Gen Pract. 2017 Apr;67(657):e300-e305 Authors: Diwakar L, Cummins C, Ryan R, Marshall T, Roberts T Abstract BACKGROUND: Adrenaline auto-injectors (AAI) should be provided to individuals considered to be at high risk of anaphylaxis. There is some evidence that the rate of AAI prescription is increasing, but the true extent has not been previously quantified. AIM: To estimate the trends in annual GP-issued prescriptions for AAI among UK children between 2000 and 2012. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective cohort study using data from primary care practices that contributed to The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database. METHOD: Children and young people aged between 0-17 years of age with a prescription for AAIs were identified, and annual AAI device prescription rates were estimated using Stata (version 12). RESULTS: A total of 1.06 million UK children were identified, providing 5.1 million person years of follow-up data. Overall, 23 837 children were deemed high risk by their GPs, and were prescribed 98 737 AAI devices. This equates to 4.67 children (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.66 to 4.69), and 19.4 (95% CI = 19.2 to 19.5) devices per 1000 person years. Between 2000 and 2012, there has been a 355% increase in the number of children prescribed devices, and a 506% increase in the total number of AAI devices prescribed per 1000 person years in the UK. The number of devices issued per high-risk child during this period has also increased by 33%. CONCLUSION: The number of children being prescribed AAI devices and the number of devices being prescribed in UK primary care between 2000 and 2012 has significantly increased. A discussion to promote rational prescribing of AAIs in the NHS is needed. PMID: 28289013 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Estimating the number of children in formal alternative care: Challenges and results.

Estimating the number of children in formal alternative care: Challenges and results. Child Abuse Negl. 2017 May 31;: Authors: Petrowski N, Cappa C, Gross P Abstract Given the relatively large body of literature documenting the adverse impacts of institutionalization on children's developmental outcomes and well-being, it is essential that countries work towards reducing the number of children in alternative care (particularly institutional care), and, when possible, reunite children with their families. In order to do so, reliable estimates of the numbers of children living in such settings are essential. However, many countries still lack functional administrative systems for enumerating children living outside of family care. The purpose of this paper is to provide a snapshot of the availability and coverage of data on children living in residential and foster care from some 142 countries covering more than 80 per cent of the world's children. Utilizing these country-level figures, it is estimated that approximately 2.7 million children between the ages of 0 and 17 years could be living in institutional care worldwide. Where possible, the article also presents regional estimates of the number of children living in residential and foster care. This work represents an important step to systematically identify and compile sources of data on children in alternative care and provides updated global and regional estimates on the magnitude of the issue. Its findings contribute to raising awareness of the urgent need to strengthen the capacity of countries to improve national systems for counting, monitoring and reporting on these vulnerable children. PMID: 28578826 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Siblings of children with complex care needs: their perspectives and experiences of participating in everyday life.

Related Articles
Siblings of children with complex care needs: their perspectives and experiences of participating in everyday life. Child Care Health Dev. 2016 07;42(4):504-12 Authors: Woodgate RL, Edwards M, Ripat JD, Rempel G, Johnson SF Abstract BACKGROUND: Participating in everyday life is essential to the healthy development and emotional well-being of children. However, little is known about siblings of children with complex care needs (CCN), and their perspectives and experiences of participating in everyday life. The aim of this paper is to present research findings that add to our understanding of how siblings of children with CCN view and experience participation in everyday life. METHODS: To arrive at a detailed and accurate understanding of the siblings' perspectives and experiences, we used the qualitative research design of ethnography. Sixteen siblings (seven brothers, nine sisters) of children with CCN were recruited. The siblings ranged in age between 7 and 25 years, with a mean age of 14 years. All siblings took part in opened-ended interviews and completed ecomaps to describe how they participate. Five siblings also took part in the photovoice method. Analysis involved several iterative steps, congruent with ethnography. RESULTS: Four main themes emerged as follows: (1) participation is about being part of a group; (2) it feels good; (3) I love my sibling but…; and (4) promoting participation. Siblings of children with CCN identified challenges to participation and also described ways that they participate that relate to the care of their sibling. CONCLUSIONS: Siblings prioritized the relationship with their sisters and brothers with CCN in their life, and a great deal of their participation was chosen with their sibling in mind. Sibling-to-sibling relationships were distinct and meaningful and, as a result, participation was always done mindfully and with the family needs at the forefront. Nonetheless, clinicians caring for children with CCN must keep in mind the challenges that siblings of children with CCN experience and provide strategies to siblings that will help to promote their participation in everyday life. PMID: 27198644 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Need For Improved Skin Cancer Surveillance in Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

Related Articles
Need For Improved Skin Cancer Surveillance in Pediatric Cancer Survivors. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2017 Apr;18(2):165-168 Authors: Sharma D, Lee T, Friedman AJ, Redbord KP Abstract Survivors of pediatric cancer are at increased risk of developing secondary malignancies, with non-melanoma skin cancer being the most common. These patients are also at increased risk of melanoma. Currently, guidelines provided by the National Cancer Institute and Children's Oncology Group emphasize the importance of annual clinical examination for skin cancer screening; however, the literature reports that less than one-third of survivors of pediatric cancer have ever had a clinical skin exam by a physician. In this article, we review the risk factors for skin cancer in survivors of pediatric cancer as well as the current evidence and recommendations for their care. We suggest that dermatologists collectively establish guidelines for skin cancer surveillance in survivors of pediatric cancer. PMID: 27943084 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The effectiveness of therapeutic conversation intervention for caregivers of adolescents with ADHD: a quasi-experimental design.

Related Articles
The effectiveness of therapeutic conversation intervention for caregivers of adolescents with ADHD: a quasi-experimental design. J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2017 Feb;24(1):15-27 Authors: Gisladottir M, Svavarsdottir EK Abstract WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Caregivers of adolescents with ADHD experience major difficulties as care providers and are in need of guidance and support. Adolescents with ADHD may develop oppositional and criminal behaviour. More than 50 % have the symptoms in adulthood, and up to one-fourth with severe emotional or antisocial difficulties. There is a lack of evidence of caregivers' supporting intervention although caregiver groups have been found to contribute to better coping, decreased stress and improvements in ADHD symptoms. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Primary caregivers of adolescents with ADHD experienced better quality of life after the Therapeutic Conversation Intervention. The intervention contributed to better social functioning among secondary caregivers. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: The content of the Therapeutic Conversation Intervention is significant and highlights the utility of a combination of group and private sessions for caregivers of people with ADHD. The intervention can influence how services for families are organized, such that a Therapeutic Conversation Intervention could be offered on a regular basis. ABSTRACT: Introduction Caregivers of adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder are burdened with tasks and many suffer from distress. Adolescents with ADHD may develop antisocial behaviour and caregiver's group can empower caregiver's supporting role. Aim/Question To evaluate the effectiveness of a Therapeutic Conversation Intervention on caregivers of adolescents with ADHD regarding strengthening the supportive role. Method The study utilized a quasi-experimental design. The participants (n = 60) were caregivers of adolescents (13-17 years old) with ADHD. The intervention consisted in-group and parent sessions. The Calgary Family Model and the Family Illness Beliefs Model were used as theoretical frameworks. Results The study revealed significant differences in the improvement of quality of life; regarding primary caregiver (PC) worry, daily activities, family relationships and collaboration post-intervention, as well emotional functioning at both post-intervention and follow-up. Secondary caregiver (SC) social functioning was significantly improved at follow-up. Discussion The intervention proved to be beneficial to the caregivers and is filling a gap in much needed intervention. Implication for practice The results will expand health care professionals' knowledge of how to increase PC quality of life when supporting their adolescent with ADHD. This treatment information should improve service at health care centres/hospitals where adolescents with ADHD receive care. PMID: 27859951 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

School Nurses’ Role in Helping Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders.

Related Articles
School Nurses' Role in Helping Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders. NASN Sch Nurse. 2017 Jan;32(1):36-38 Authors: AlAzzam M, Suliman M, ALBashtawy M Abstract Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a multifaceted disease characterized by core symptoms of hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsivity, affecting children across every socioeconomic and ethnic group. An estimated 40% to 60% of children with ADHD have comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, and learning disabilities. School nurses must be an integral part of the process of increasing awareness about ADHD through improving the service delivery model for affected children and their families. There is a solid foundation of research on which they can build to improve the benefits through study, workshops, community programs, and national screening programs. PMID: 27194240 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Environmental exposure to human carcinogens in teenagers and the association with DNA damage.

Related Articles
Environmental exposure to human carcinogens in teenagers and the association with DNA damage. Environ Res. 2017 Jan;152:165-174 Authors: Franken C, Koppen G, Lambrechts N, Govarts E, Bruckers L, Den Hond E, Loots I, Nelen V, Sioen I, Nawrot TS, Baeyens W, Van Larebeke N, Boonen F, Ooms D, Wevers M, Jacobs G, Covaci A, Schettgen T, Schoeters G Abstract BACKGROUND: We investigated whether human environmental exposure to chemicals that are labeled as (potential) carcinogens leads to increased (oxidative) damage to DNA in adolescents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six hundred 14-15-year-old youngsters were recruited all over Flanders (Belgium) and in two areas with important industrial activities. DNA damage was assessed by alkaline and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) modified comet assays in peripheral blood cells and analysis of urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels. Personal exposure to potentially carcinogenic compounds was measured in urine, namely: chromium, cadmium, nickel, 1-hydroxypyrene as a proxy for exposure to other carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), t,t-muconic acid as a metabolite of benzene, 2,5-dichlorophenol (2,5-DCP), organophosphate pesticide metabolites, and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolites. In blood, arsenic, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners 118 and 156, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) were analyzed. Levels of methylmercury (MeHg) were measured in hair. Multiple linear regression models were used to establish exposure-response relationships. RESULTS: Biomarkers of exposure to PAHs and urinary chromium were associated with higher levels of both 8-OHdG in urine and DNA damage detected by the alkaline comet assay. Concentrations of 8-OHdG in urine increased in relation with increasing concentrations of urinary t,t-muconic acid, cadmium, nickel, 2,5-DCP, and DEHP metabolites. Increased concentrations of PFOA in blood were associated with higher levels of DNA damage measured by the alkaline comet assay, whereas DDT was associated in the same direction with the Fpg-modified comet assay. Inverse associations were observed between blood arsenic, hair MeHg, PCB 156 and HCB, and urinary 8-OHdG. The latter exposure biomarkers were also associated with higher fish intake. Urinary nickel and t,t-muconic acid were inversely associated with the alkaline comet assay. CONCLUSION: This cross-sectional study found associations between current environmental exposure to (potential) human carcinogens in 14-15-year-old Flemish adolescents and short-term (oxidative) damage to DNA. Prospective follow-up will be required to investigate whether long-term effects may occur due to complex environmental exposures. PMID: 27771571 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

“Doctor, are you listening?” Communication about children’s mental health and psychosocial concerns.

Related Articles
"Doctor, are you listening?" Communication about children's mental health and psychosocial concerns. Fam Syst Health. 2017 03;35(1):91-93 Authors: Pidano AE, Padukkavidana MM, Honigfeld L Abstract Effective communication is critical, including in the pediatric primary care setting. Pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) are in a unique position to address psychosocial and mental health concerns during office visits, and effective communication skills play a crucial role in providing an opportunity for parents and patients to disclose and discuss such concerns. In this article, the authors encourage two relatively simple strategies that have shown potential for enhancing effective communication in pediatric primary care regarding mental health and psychosocial issues: (a) ensure that pediatric residents and practicing providers have access to brief, targeted communications training and (b) strongly promote the use of screening tools both to encourage discussion and to assist in identifying children who may benefit from further assessment and/or treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID: 28333519 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Quality of Caregiving in Mothers With Illicit Substance Use: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Related Articles
Quality of Caregiving in Mothers With Illicit Substance Use: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Subst Abuse. 2017;11:1178221817694038 Authors: Hatzis D, Dawe S, Harnett P, Barlow J Abstract BACKGROUND: The quality of caregiving in mothers with substance abuse problems appears to be compromised. However, divergent findings, methodological variability, and sample characteristics point to the need for research synthesis. METHODS: A comprehensive systematic search was undertaken. Studies were eligible if they (1) compared substance-misusing mothers with non-substance-misusing mothers, (2) involved children from birth to 3 years, and (3) maternal sensitivity and child responsiveness were measured using observational methodology. RESULTS: A global meta-analysis for maternal sensitivity (n = 24 studies) and child responsiveness (n = 16 studies) on 3433 mother-infant dyads yielded significant population effect sizes and significant heterogeneity. Subgroup analyses found reduced heterogeneity when the meta-analysis was conducted on studies where groups were matched on key demographic characteristics; although the effect size was small, it was still significant for maternal sensitivity but not child responsiveness. CONCLUSIONS: Compromised quality of caregiving is found in high-risk, substance-misusing mothers, emphasising the importance of early intervention that draws from attachment-based interventions. PMID: 28469425 [PubMed - in process]

Students With Asthma and Its Impacts.

Related Articles
Students With Asthma and Its Impacts. NASN Sch Nurse. 2017 May 01;:1942602X17710499 Authors: Isik E, Isik IS Abstract Asthma is a common chronic disease in children. Uncontrolled asthma is a significant contributor to school absenteeism, emergency room visits, and hospitalization, all of which can lead to low school performance, financial burdens, and emotional problems for children and their parents. Asthma in children restricts the activities of school-aged children, such as participating in before- and after-school activity and extracurricular activities such as sports. Uncontrolled asthma has the potential to impact a student's self-confidence and social interactions. This article reviews the physical, emotional, and social burden of asthma on school-aged children/parents as well as recounting school asthma intervention programs. One of the roles of the school nurse is to be the leader of the intervention programs, manage asthma, and provide education for the students, parents, and school community to promote knowledge about asthma and its management. PMID: 28548873 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Suicide and violent deaths in survivors of cancer in childhood, adolescence and young adulthood-A national cohort study.

Related Articles
Suicide and violent deaths in survivors of cancer in childhood, adolescence and young adulthood-A national cohort study. Int J Cancer. 2017 Feb 01;140(3):575-580 Authors: Gunnes MW, Lie RT, Bjørge T, Ghaderi S, Syse A, Ruud E, Wesenberg F, Moster D Abstract Suicide risk in adult cancer patients is found to be elevated, but limited information exists regarding risks of suicide and non-suicidal violent deaths when diagnosed with cancer in young age. We investigate suicide and violent deaths in a national cohort including individuals diagnosed with cancer before age 25. Through the linkage of different national registries (Cancer Registry of Norway, Norwegian Causes of Death Registry and the National Registry) a cohort of all live births in Norway during 1965-1985 was defined and followed up through 2008. Individuals diagnosed with cancer before age 25 and the cancer-free references were compared using an extended Cox proportional hazard regression model. The cohort comprised 1,218,013 individuals, including 5,440 diagnosed with cancer before age 25. We identified 24 suicides and 14 non-suicidal violent deaths in the cancer group. The hazard ratio (HR) of suicide in the cancer group was 2.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.8), and was increased both when diagnosed with cancer in childhood (0-14 years of age); HR = 2.3 (95% CI: 1.2-4.6), and during adolescence/young adulthood (15-24 years); HR = 2.6 (95% CI: 1.5-4.2). Survivors of bone/soft tissue sarcomas, CNS tumors and testicular cancer were at particular risk. The risk of non-suicidal violent death was not increased in the cancer survivors (HR = 1.0; 95% CI: 0.6-1.7). Although based on small numbers and the absolute risk of suicide being low, these are novel findings with important implications for establishing adequate follow-up including suicide prevention strategies for young cancer survivors. PMID: 27750385 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Effect of probiotics on digestibility and immunity in infants: A study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

Related Articles
Effect of probiotics on digestibility and immunity in infants: A study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Apr;96(14):e5953 Authors: Xiao L, Ding G, Ding Y, Deng C, Ze X, Chen L, Zhang Y, Song L, Yan H, Liu F, Ben X Abstract The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of a fetus in utero is sterile but it becomes colonized with environmental microorganisms shortly after birth. Since the gut microbiota undergoes substantial changes in early life, healthy gut microflora is essential to an infant's gut health and immune system and probably also has an effect on overall health status in later life. Probiotics, defined as viable microbial preparations that have a beneficial effect on the health of the host, represent a rapidly expanding field. Although randomized controlled trials using probiotics in infants have shown promising results in the prevention and treatment of common diseases such as diarrhea and allergy, little is known about whether probiotics could offer benefits to healthy infants. We have designed a randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that an oral preparation of probiotics is superior to placebo in improving digestive and immune function in healthy infants.The trial will be a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-parallel-group study in Shanghai, China. After a 2-week run-in period, 200 exclusively formula-fed healthy infants aged 4 to 6 months will be randomly allocated to receive either a probiotic product containing Bifidobacterium infantis R0033, Bifidobacterium bifidum R0071, and Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 or an identical placebo once daily for 4 weeks and will be followed up for 8 weeks. The duration of the subject's participation will be 14 weeks, with a total of 5 visits: inclusion (Visit 1, Day 1), start of intervention (V2, D15), end of intervention (V3, D44), and follow-up (V4 and V5, D72 and D100). Stool and saliva samples will be collected at the first 3 visits to measure microbial populations and secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), respectively. Physical examination will be performed at each visit, and tolerance records will be completed 1 day prior to each visit. The primary endpoints will be the changes in the composition of fecal microbiota, particularly the Bifidobacterium bifidum population. The secondary endpoints will include the change in salivary SIgA level, growth parameters, digestive tolerance, and adverse events.An effective, practical, and acceptable probiotic intervention in manipulating the gut microbiota and boosting the immune system in formula-fed infants would represent a major clinical advance. The administration of probiotic supplementation or follow-on formula to infant may be associated with some clinic benefits. PMID: 28383398 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Clinical decision support systems in child and adolescent psychiatry: a systematic review.

Related Articles
Clinical decision support systems in child and adolescent psychiatry: a systematic review. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2017 Apr 28;: Authors: Koposov R, Fossum S, Frodl T, Nytrø Ø, Leventhal B, Sourander A, Quaglini S, Molteni M, de la Iglesia Vayá M, Prokosch HU, Barbarini N, Milham MP, Castellanos FX, Skokauskas N Abstract Psychiatric disorders are amongst the most prevalent and impairing conditions in childhood and adolescence. Unfortunately, it is well known that general practitioners (GPs) and other frontline health providers (i.e., child protection workers, public health nurses, and pediatricians) are not adequately trained to address these ubiquitous problems (Braddick et al. Child and Adolescent mental health in Europe: infrastructures, policy and programmes, European Communities, 2009; Levav et al. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 13:395-401, 2004). Advances in technology may offer a solution to this problem with clinical decision support systems (CDSS) that are designed to help professionals make sound clinical decisions in real time. This paper offers a systematic review of currently available CDSS for child and adolescent mental health disorders prepared according to the PRISMA-Protocols (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols). Applying strict eligibility criteria, the identified studies (n = 5048) were screened. Ten studies, describing eight original clinical decision support systems for child and adolescent psychiatric disorders, fulfilled inclusion criteria. Based on this systematic review, there appears to be a need for a new, readily available CDSS for child neuropsychiatric disorder which promotes evidence-based, best practices, while enabling consideration of national variation in practices by leveraging data-reuse to generate predictions regarding treatment outcome, addressing a broader cluster of clinical disorders, and targeting frontline practice environments. PMID: 28455596 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Understanding the linkages between social safety nets and childhood violence: a review of the evidence from low- and middle-income countries.

Related Articles
Understanding the linkages between social safety nets and childhood violence: a review of the evidence from low- and middle-income countries. Health Policy Plan. 2017 Apr 22;: Authors: Peterman A, Neijhoft AN, Cook S, Palermo TM Abstract As many as one billion children experience violence every year, and household- and community-level poverty are among the risk factors for child protection violations. Social safety nets (SSNs) are a main policy tool to address poverty and vulnerability, and there is substantial evidence demonstrating positive effects on children's health and human capital. This paper reviews evidence and develops a framework to understand linkages between non-contributory SSNs and the experience of childhood emotional, physical and sexual violence in low- and middle-income countries. We catalogue 14 rigorous impact evaluations, 11 of which are completed, analysing 57 unique impacts on diverse violence indicators. Among these impacts, approximately one in five represent statistically significant protective effects on childhood violence. Promising evidence relates to sexual violence among female adolescents in Africa, while there is less clear evidence of significant impacts in other parts of the developing world, and on young child measures, including violent discipline. Further, few studies are set up to meaningfully unpack mechanisms between SSNs and childhood violence; however, those most commonly hypothesized operate at the household level (through increases in economic security and reductions in poverty-related stress), the interpersonal level (improved parental behaviours, caregiving practices, improved psychosocial well-being) and at the child-level (protective education and decreases in problem or risky behaviours). It is important to emphasize that traditional SSNs are never designed with violence prevention as primary objectives, and thus should not be considered as standalone interventions to reduce risks for childhood violence. However, SSNs, particularly within integrated protection systems, appear to have potential to reduce violence risk. Linkages between SSNs and childhood violence are understudied, and investments should be made to close this evidence gap. PMID: 28444197 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Persistent Pneumonia: Time to Take a Closer Look.

Related Articles
Persistent Pneumonia: Time to Take a Closer Look. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2017 Jan;33(1):31-33 Authors: Ruttan T, Vezzetti R, Scalo J Abstract Primary pulmonary tumors are rare in pediatrics. When they are encountered, they are usually carcinoid tumors or mucoepidermoid carcinomas. We present a patient who presented to both his primary care physician and the pediatric emergency department with recurrent bouts of wheezing and pneumonia, none of which ever completely resolved despite appropriate treatment. The patient had multiple chest films, which demonstrated the persistence of what appeared to be a right-sided infiltrate/atelectasis. Ultimately, the patient underwent a diagnostic workup that included a computed tomography scan and bronchoscopy. These studies revealed the presence of a bronchial mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The patient was successfully treated with photoablation of the lesion through the involvement of multiple subspecialists, including pediatric pulmonology, pediatric surgery, pediatric otolaryngology, and pediatric oncology. We discuss the incidence and epidemiology of pediatric bronchial tumors in general and mucoepidermoid carcinoma in particular as well as diagnosis, treatment options, and prognosis. Emergency physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion for alternate diagnoses in patients whose disease fails to respond to traditionally accepted therapy. PMID: 26414631 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Do Adolescents With Higher Knowledge of HIV Have Lower Sexual Risk Behaviors?

Related Articles
Do Adolescents With Higher Knowledge of HIV Have Lower Sexual Risk Behaviors? Pediatr Emerg Care. 2016 Dec;32(12):846-850 Authors: Hoehn EF, FitzGerald MR, Bhatt SR, Robinson VM, Lippe JE, Reed JL Abstract OBJECTIVES: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and adolescents account for a disproportionate number of new cases. We aimed to assess knowledge of HIV in relation to sexual risk behaviors among adolescents seeking care in our pediatric emergency department and to assess sources of HIV knowledge among this population. METHODS: Adolescents aged 14 to 21 years who presented to the pediatric emergency department participated in a questionnaire assessing HIV knowledge, sexual risk behaviors, and sources of HIV knowledge. For purposes of statistical analysis, patients were divided into a high-score (greater than or equal to the median score) or low-score (less than the median score) group based on the HIV-Knowledge Questionnaire 18 portion of the survey. RESULTS: A total of 240 adolescents were enrolled. Of those, 112 patients scored higher than or equal to the median HIV-Knowledge Questionnaire 18 score of 11. High-scoring knowledge was independently associated with patients 18 years or older (P = 0.001), any lifetime sexual activity (odds ratio [OR], 2.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-3.67; P = 0.003), previous testing for HIV (OR, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.40-4.11; P = 0.002), and an "expert" source (school-based or medical professionals) as their primary source of knowledge (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.05-3.41; P = 0.034). Age of first sexual encounter, number of partners, and condom use were not significantly associated with knowledge score. CONCLUSIONS: Education from "expert" sources is important in providing adolescents with accurate information. However, education alone is unlikely to change sexual practices. A more comprehensive approach to HIV prevention is needed to decrease HIV transmission among this patient population. PMID: 26760829 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Context matters! sources of variability in weekend physical activity among families: a repeated measures study.

Related Articles
Context matters! sources of variability in weekend physical activity among families: a repeated measures study. BMC Public Health. 2017 Apr 18;17(1):330 Authors: Noonan RJ, Fairclough SJ, Knowles ZR, Boddy LM Abstract BACKGROUND: Family involvement is an essential component of effective physical activity (PA) interventions in children. However, little is known about the PA levels and characteristics of PA among families. This study used a repeated measures design and multiple data sources to explore the variability and characteristics of weekend PA among families. METHODS: Families (including a 'target' child aged 9-11 years, their primary caregiver(s) and siblings aged 6-8 years) were recruited through primary schools in Liverpool, UK. Participants completed a paper-based PA diary and wore an ActiGraph GT9X accelerometer on their left wrist for up to 16 weekend days. ActiGraph.csv files were analysed using the R-package GGIR version 1.1-4. Mean minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) for each weekend of measurement were calculated using linear mixed models, and variance components were estimated for participant (inter-individual), weekend of measurement, and residual error (intra-individual). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated from the proportion of total variance accounted for by inter-individual sources, and used as a measure of reliability. Diary responses were summed to produce frequency counts. To offer contextual insight into weekend PA among family units, demographic, accelerometer, and diary data were combined to form two case studies representative of low and high active families. RESULTS: Twenty-five participants from 7 families participated, including 7 'target' children (mean age 9.3 ± 1.1 years, 4 boys), 6 siblings (mean age 7.2 ± 0.7 years; 4 boys) and 12 adults (7 mothers and 5 fathers). There was a high degree of variability in target children's (ICC = 0.55), siblings (ICC = 0.38), and mothers' MVPA (ICC = 0.58), but not in fathers' MVPA (ICC = 0.83). Children's weekend PA was mostly unstructured in nature and undertaken with friends, whereas a greater proportion of parents' weekend PA was undertaken alone in structured settings. The family case studies demonstrated that in the selected cases MVPA levels and variability across weekends were contingent on mode of PA participation. CONCLUSIONS: These novel findings enhance understanding of the variability and characteristics of weekend PA among family units. The study demonstrates the utility of PA diaries in conjunction with accelerometers to provide understanding of the mode and contexts of out-of-school and family-based PA. PMID: 28420363 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Clinical Status of Adolescents with Perinatal HIV at Transfer to Adult Care in the UK/Ireland.

Related Articles
Clinical Status of Adolescents with Perinatal HIV at Transfer to Adult Care in the UK/Ireland. Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Apr 15;64(8):1105-1112 Authors: Collins IJ, Foster C, Tostevin A, Tookey P, Riordan A, Dunn D, Gibb DM, Judd A, Collaborative HIV Paediatric Study (CHIPS) Steering Committee Abstract Background.: Increasing numbers of children infected perinatally with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are surviving to adolescence and transitioning to adult care, yet there are scarce data on their clinical status at transfer. Methods.: We analyzed prospective cohort data from the UK/Ireland national Collaborative HIV Pediatric Study (CHIPS). Clinical status at last pediatric clinic visit prior to transfer was described. Factors associated with higher CD4 cell count and viral load (VL) suppression<400 c/mL among patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) at transfer were assessed using linear and logistic regression, respectively. Data were matched with the UK HIV Drug Resistance Database (UKHIVDRB) to assess cumulative resistance profiles at transfer. Results.: Of 1,907 children followed in CHIPS from 1996 to November 2014, 644 (34%) transferred to adult care: 53% were female, 62% born outside the UK/Ireland, 75% black African. At last pediatric follow-up, median age was 17.4 years [interquartile range 16.5,18.1], 27% had previous AIDS diagnosis, CD4 was 444 cells/mm3 [280, 643], 76% were on ART, 13% off-ART, and 11% ART-naive. Among patients on ART, 74% had VL<400 c/mL. In multivariable analysis, higher CD4 at transfer was associated with younger age, higher CD4 at ART initiation and lower VL at transfer (P ≤ .001). Predictors of viral suppression include no AIDS diagnosis and later year of transfer (P ≤ .05). Of 291 patients with resistance data, 82% had resistance to ≥1 drug class, 56% to ≥2 classes and 12% had triple-class resistance. Conclusion.: Three-quarters of adolescents were on stable ART at transfer, of whom 74% were virologically suppressed. The prevalence of triple-class resistance was relatively low at 12%. PMID: 28329212 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infection in Young Children (DUTY) Study Clinical Rule: Economic Evaluation.

Related Articles
The Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infection in Young Children (DUTY) Study Clinical Rule: Economic Evaluation. Value Health. 2017 Apr;20(4):556-566 Authors: Hollingworth W, Busby J, Butler CC, O'Brien K, Sterne JA, Hood K, Little P, Lawton M, Birnie K, Thomas-Jones E, Harman K, Hay AD, DUTY Study Team Abstract OBJECTIVE: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of a two-step clinical rule using symptoms, signs and dipstick testing to guide the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI) in acutely unwell young children presenting to primary care. METHODS: Decision analytic model synthesising data from a multicentre, prospective cohort study (DUTY) and the wider literature to estimate the short-term and lifetime costs and healthcare outcomes (symptomatic days, recurrent UTI, quality adjusted life years) of eight diagnostic strategies. We compared GP clinical judgement with three strategies based on a 'coefficient score' combining seven symptoms and signs independently associated with UTI and four strategies based on weighted scores according to the presence/absence of five symptoms and signs. We compared dipstick testing versus laboratory culture in children at intermediate risk of UTI. RESULTS: Sampling, culture and antibiotic costs were lowest in high-specificity DUTY strategies (£1.22 and £1.08) compared to clinical judgement (£1.99). These strategies also approximately halved urine sampling (4.8% versus 9.1% in clinical judgement) without reducing sensitivity (58.2% versus 56.4%). Outcomes were very similar across all diagnostic strategies. High-specificity DUTY strategies were more cost-effective than clinical judgement in the short- (iNMB = £0.78 and £0.84) and long-term (iNMB =£2.31 and £2.50). Dipstick tests had poorer cost-effectiveness than laboratory culture in children at intermediate risk of UTI (iNMB = £-1.41). CONCLUSIONS: Compared to GPs' clinical judgement, high specificity clinical rules from the DUTY study could substantially reduce urine sampling, achieving lower costs and equivalent patient outcomes. Dipstick testing children for UTI is not cost-effective. PMID: 28407997 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Is the infant car seat challenge useful? A pilot study in a simulated moving vehicle.

Related Articles
Is the infant car seat challenge useful? A pilot study in a simulated moving vehicle. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2017 Mar;102(2):F136-F141 Authors: Arya R, Williams G, Kilonback A, Toward M, Griffin M, Blair PS, Fleming P Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that preterm infants complete a predischarge 'car seat challenge' observation for cardiorespiratory compromise while in a car seat. This static challenge does not consider the more upright position in a car or the vibration of the seat when the car is moving. This pilot study was designed to assess the cardiorespiratory effects of vibration, mimicking the effect of being in a moving car, on preterm and term infants. METHODS: A simulator was designed to reproduce vertical vibration similar to that in a rear-facing car seat at 30 mph. 19 healthy newborn term and 21 preterm infants, ready for hospital discharge, underwent cardiorespiratory measurements while lying flat in a cot (baseline), static in the seat (30°), simulator (40°) and during motion (vibration 40°). RESULTS: Median test age was 13 days (range 1-65 days) and median weight was 2.5 kg (IQR: 2.1-3.1 kg).Compared with baseline observations, only the total number of desaturations was significantly increased when infants were placed at 30° (p=0.03). At 40°, or with vibration, respiratory and heart rates increased and oxygen saturation decreased significantly. Profound desaturations <85% significantly increased during motion, regardless of gestational age. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to assess the effect of motion on infants seated in a car safety seat. Term and preterm infants showed significant signs of potentially adverse cardiorespiratory effects in the upright position at 40°, particularly with simulated motion, not identified in the standard challenge. A larger study is required to investigate the significance of these results. PMID: 27694399 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Risk of Pertussis in Relation to Degree of Prematurity in Children Less Than 2 Years of Age.

Related Articles
Risk of Pertussis in Relation to Degree of Prematurity in Children Less Than 2 Years of Age. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017 May;36(5):e151-e156 Authors: Riise ØR, Laake I, Vestrheim D, Flem E, Moster D, Riise Bergsaker MA, Storsæter J Abstract BACKGROUND: A few previous studies reported increased risk of pertussis in children with birth weight less than 2500 g. The risk of pertussis by degree of prematurity has not been determined in a cohort study. The vaccine effectiveness (VE) against reported pertussis in preterm infants is unknown. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (1998-2010) and linked to other national registries. In total, 713,166 children were included in our study and followed until 2 years of age. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated with Poisson regression. RESULTS: We identified 999 reported cases of pertussis. We observed a higher rate of reported pertussis in preterm than in full-term infants, IRR = 1.65 (95% CI: 1.32-2.07). Compared to full-term infants, the risk of reported pertussis in infants born at gestational age (GA) 35-36, 32-34 and 23-27 weeks were higher [IRRs = 1.49 (95% CI: 1.11-2.01), 1.63 (95% CI: 1.06-2.51) and 4.49 (95% CI: 2.33-8.67), respectively]. Moreover, preterm infants had a higher rate of pertussis-related hospitalization than full-term infants [IRR = 1.99 (95% CI: 1.47-2.71)]. The VE against reported pertussis for the third dose was 88.8% (95% CI: 84.3-92.0) in full-term infants and 93.0% (95% CI: 85.8-96.5) in preterm infants. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort study, preterm infants including those born at GA 35 and 36 weeks had increased risk of reported pertussis. The VE was similar in preterm and full-term infants. PMID: 28403056 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Home uterine monitoring for detecting preterm labour.

Related Articles
Home uterine monitoring for detecting preterm labour. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2017 02 15;2:CD006172 Authors: Urquhart C, Currell R, Harlow F, Callow L Abstract BACKGROUND: To reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with preterm birth, home uterine activity monitoring aims for early detection of increased contraction frequency, and early intervention with tocolytic drugs to inhibit labour and prolong pregnancy. However, the effectiveness of such monitoring is disputed. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether home uterine activity monitoring is effective in improving the outcomes for women and their infants considered to be at high risk of preterm birth, when compared with care that does not include home uterine activity monitoring. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 June 2016), CENTRAL (Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to 28 June 2016), Embase (1974 to 28 June 2016), CINAHL (1982 to 28 June 2016), and scanned reference lists of retrieved studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised control trials of home uterine activity monitoring, with or without patient education programmes, for women at risk of preterm birth, compared with care that does not include home uterine activity monitoring. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risks of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. We did not attempt to contact authors to resolve queries. We assessed the evidence using the GRADE approach. MAIN RESULTS: There were 15 included studies (6008 enrolled participants); 13 studies contributed data. Women using home uterine monitoring were less likely to experience preterm birth at less than 34 weeks (risk ratio (RR) 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62 to 0.99; three studies, 1596 women; fixed-effect analysis) (GRADE high). This difference was not evident when we carried out a sensitivity analysis, restricting the analysis to studies at low risk of bias based on study quality (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.00; one study, 1292 women). There was no difference in the rate of perinatal mortality (RR 1.22, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.72; two studies, 2589 babies) (GRADE low).There was no difference in the number of preterm births at less than 37 weeks (average RR 0.85, CI 0.72 to 1.01; eight studies, 4834 women; random-effects, Tau(2) = 0.03, I(2) = 68%) (GRADE very low). Infants born to women using home uterine monitoring were less likely to be admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (average RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.96; five studies, 2367 babies; random-effects, Tau(2) = 0.02, I(2) = 32%) (GRADE moderate). This difference was not maintained when we restricted the analysis to studies at low risk of bias (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.01; one study, 1292 babies). Women using home uterine monitoring made more unscheduled antenatal visits (mean difference (MD) 0.48, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.64; two studies, 1994 women) (GRADE moderate). Women using home uterine monitoring were also more likely to have prophylactic tocolytic drug therapy (average RR 1.21, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.45; seven studies, 4316 women; random-effects, Tau(2) = 0.03, I(2) = 62%), but this difference was no longer evident when we restricted the analysis to studies at low risk of bias (average RR 1.22, 95% CI 0.90 to 1.65; three studies, 3749 women; random-effects, Tau(2) = 0.05, I(2) = 76%) (GRADE low). The number of antenatal hospital admissions did not differ between home groups (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.11; three studies, 1494 women (GRADE low)). We found no data on maternal anxiety or acceptability. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Home uterine monitoring may result in fewer admissions to a neonatal intensive care unit but in more unscheduled antenatal visits and tocolytic treatment; the level of evidence is generally low to moderate. Important group differences were not evident when we undertook sensitivity analysis using only trials at low risk of bias. There is no impact on maternal and perinatal outcomes such as perinatal mortality or incidence of preterm birth. PMID: 28205207 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Eliciting Preferences for Information Provision in Newborn Bloodspot Screening Programs.

Related Articles
Eliciting Preferences for Information Provision in Newborn Bloodspot Screening Programs. Value Health. 2017 Apr;20(4):651-661 Authors: Wright SJ, Ulph F, Dharni N, Payne K Abstract BACKGROUND: The national newborn bloodspot screening programs (NBSPs) are continually expanding to screen for more conditions. OBJECTIVES: To quantify parents' preferences for information and the way in which this is provided in example NBSPs. METHODS: A hybrid choice experiment, combining a conjoint analysis and a discrete choice experiment, was designed. A sample of current and future parents between the ages of 18 and 45 years was identified via an Internet panel. Respondents completed one of two survey versions (9 conditions and 20 conditions) comprising a validated measure of attitudes toward involvement in decision making, 6 CA questions (11 information attributes), 10 DCE questions (4 attributes: 3 process and the ability to make an informed decision), and demographic questions. RESULTS: Of the 702 respondents who completed the survey, 58% were women, 48% were between 25 and 34 years old, and 48% were current parents. All types of information were identified to statistically significantly improve parents' ability to make a decision. Participants preferred taking an "active" role in decision making. Respondents to the 9-condition survey preferred information before 20 weeks (willingness to pay [WTP] £11.88; CI £5.56 to £19.53) and the 20-condition group after 20 weeks (WTP £15.91; CI £10.64 to £21.63). All respondents disliked receiving information 3 days after birth, with the 20-condition group also being averse to receiving it on day 5 (WTP -£11.20; CI -£18.40 to 5.72). Respondents in both groups preferred to receive their information in an individual discussion. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that parents' preferences for receiving NBS information differ from how this information is given in current UK practice. PMID: 28408008 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Models of midwifery care for Indigenous women and babies: A meta-synthesis.

Related Articles
Models of midwifery care for Indigenous women and babies: A meta-synthesis. Women Birth. 2017 Feb;30(1):77-86 Authors: Corcoran PM, Catling C, Homer CS Abstract ISSUE: Indigenous women in many countries experience a lack of access to culturally appropriate midwifery services. A number of models of care have been established to provide services to women. Research has examined some services, but there has not been a synthesis of qualitative studies of the models of care to help guide practice development and innovations. AIM: To undertake a review of qualitative studies of midwifery models of care for Indigenous women and babies evaluating the different types of services available and the experiences of women and midwives. METHODS: A meta-synthesis was undertaken to examine all relevant qualitative studies. The literature search was limited to English-language published literature from 2000-2014. Nine qualitative studies met the inclusion criteria and literature appraisal - six from Australia and three from Canada. These articles were analysed for coding and theme development. FINDINGS: The major themes were valuing continuity of care, managing structural issues, having negative experiences with mainstream services and recognising success. DISCUSSION: The most positive experiences for women were found with the services that provided continuity of care, had strong community links and were controlled by Indigenous communities. Overall, the experience of the midwifery services for Indigenous women was valuable. Despite this, there were still barriers preventing the provision of intrapartum midwifery care in remote areas. CONCLUSION: The expansion of midwifery models of care for Indigenous women and babies could be beneficial in order to improve cultural safety, experiences and outcomes in relation to pregnancy and birth. PMID: 27612623 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Non-surgical management of obstructive sleep apnoea: a review.

Related Articles
Non-surgical management of obstructive sleep apnoea: a review. Paediatr Int Child Health. 2017 Feb;37(1):1-5 Authors: Whitla L, Lennon P Abstract BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnoea is common in children and, if untreated, can lead to multiple medical sequelae. The Childhood Adenotonsillectomy Trial demonstrated benefit from early surgical intervention, but rapid access to such treatment is not always available. AIMS: To examine the recent literature on non-surgical aspects of the management of paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). METHODS: The English language literature was searched for articles on the conservative management of OSA. RESULTS: In mild cases of OSA, intra-nasal steroids and other anti-inflammatory medications may give relief in mild cases of OSA, but the long-term safety of these treatments has not been established. Weight loss in obese children has been shown to be effective in selected patients but is limited in practice. Non-invasive ventilation may be effective but compliance can be a major obstacle. Oral appliances are effective by stenting the pharyngeal airway, but research in this area is limited. CONCLUSIONS: There are number of potential, if not proven, alternative management strategies for children with OSA, which could be considered in the absence of early surgical intervention. PMID: 27077480 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Randomised controlled trial of silk therapeutic garments for the management of atopic eczema in children: the CLOTHES trial.

Related Articles
Randomised controlled trial of silk therapeutic garments for the management of atopic eczema in children: the CLOTHES trial. Health Technol Assess. 2017 Apr;21(16):1-260 Authors: Thomas KS, Bradshaw LE, Sach TH, Cowdell F, Batchelor JM, Lawton S, Harrison EF, Haines RH, Ahmed A, Dean T, Burrows NP, Pollock I, Buckley HK, Williams HC, Llewellyn J, Crang C, Grundy JD, Guiness J, Gribbin A, Wake EV, Mitchell EJ, Brown SJ, Montgomery AA Abstract BACKGROUND: Atopic eczema (AE) is a chronic, itchy, inflammatory skin condition that affects the quality of life of children and their families. The role of specialist clothing in the management of AE is poorly understood. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of silk garments for the management of AE in children with moderate to severe disease. DESIGN: Parallel-group, observer-blind, randomised controlled trial of 6 months' duration, followed by a 2-month observational period. A nested qualitative study evaluated the beliefs of trial participants, health-care professionals and health-care commissioners about the use of silk garments for AE. SETTING: Secondary care and the community in five UK centres. PARTICIPANTS: Children aged 1-15 years with moderate or severe AE. INTERVENTIONS: Participants were randomised (1 : 1 using online randomisation) to standard care or standard care plus 100% silk garments made from antimicrobially protected knitted sericin-free silk [DermaSilk(TM) (AlPreTec Srl, San Donà di Piave, Italy) or DreamSkin(TM) (DreamSkin Health Ltd, Hatfield, UK)]. Three sets of garments were supplied per participant, to be worn for up to 6 months (day and night). At 6 months the standard care group received the garments to use for the remaining 2-month observational period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome - AE severity using the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) assessed at 2, 4 and 6 months, by nurses blinded to treatment allocation. EASI scores were log-transformed for analysis. Secondary outcomes - patient-reported eczema symptoms (Patient Oriented Eczema Measure); global assessment of severity (Investigator Global Assessment); quality of life of the child (Atopic Dermatitis Quality of Life, Child Health Utility - 9 Dimensions), family (Dermatitis Family Impact Questionnaire) and main carer (EuroQoL-5 Dimensions-3 Levels); use of standard eczema treatments (e.g. emollients, topical corticosteroids); and cost-effectiveness. The acceptability and durability of the clothing, and adherence to wearing the garments, were assessed by parental/carer self-report. Safety outcomes - number of skin infections and hospitalisations for AE. RESULTS: A total of 300 children were randomised (26 November 2013 to 5 May 2015): 42% female, 79% white, mean age 5 years. The primary analysis included 282 out of 300 (94%) children (n = 141 in each group). Garments were worn for at least 50% of the time by 82% of participants. Geometric mean EASI scores at baseline, 2, 4 and 6 months were 8.4, 6.6, 6.0, 5.4 for standard care and 9.2, 6.4, 5.8, 5.4 for silk clothing, respectively. There was no evidence of difference between the groups in EASI score averaged over all follow-up visits adjusted for baseline EASI score, age and centre (ratio of geometric means 0.95, 95% confidence interval 0.85 to 1.07; p = 0.43). This confidence interval is equivalent to a difference of -1.5 to 0.5 in the original EASI scale units. Skin infections occurred in 39 out of 141 (28%) and 36 out of 142 (25%) participants for standard care and silk clothing groups, respectively. The incremental cost per QALY of silk garments for children with moderate to severe eczema was £56,811 from a NHS perspective in the base case. Sensitivity analyses supported the finding that silk garments do not appear to be cost-effective within currently accepted thresholds. LIMITATIONS: Knowledge of treatment allocation may have affected behaviour and outcome reporting for some of the patient-reported outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The addition of silk garments to standard AE care is unlikely to improve AE severity, or to be cost-effective compared with standard care alone, for children with moderate or severe AE. This trial adds to the evidence base to guide clinical decision-making. FUTURE WORK: Non-pharmacological interventions for the management of AE remain a research priority among patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN77261365. FUNDING: This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 21, No. 16. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information. PMID: 28409557 [PubMed - in process]

Preparing the Family and Children for Surgery.

Related Articles
Preparing the Family and Children for Surgery. Crit Care Nurs Q. 2017 Apr/Jun;40(2):99-107 Authors: Yahya Al-Sagarat A, Al-Oran HM, Obeidat H, Hamlan AM, Moxham L Abstract The focus of this literature analysis is the concept of preparing the family and children for surgery. As posited in the literature, surgery causes stress and anxiety that have a negative impact on both parents and their children. Therefore, the need for health care professionals to facilitate positive preparation for surgery to minimize anxiety and enhance postoperative recovery is important. Preparing the family and children for surgery is discussed in depth under the following themes: Preoperative Anxiety in Children, the Impact of Preoperative Anxiety on the Pediatric Patients and Parents, Preoperative Psychological Preparation for Children and Parents, and the Role of Nurse Practitioners in Preoperative Preparation. Through reviewing the literature, it would appear that some areas of preparation for parents are not as sufficient as they could be, particularly with regard to adequate preoperative education programs. The majority of studies reported that therapeutic play and clown interventions used for psychological preparation of parents and their children have been effective in minimizing and decreasing anxiety levels. PMID: 28240692 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Newborn vitamin K prophylaxis: an analysis of information resources for parents and professionals.

Related Articles
Newborn vitamin K prophylaxis: an analysis of information resources for parents and professionals. N Z Med J. 2016 Dec 02;129(1446):44-52 Authors: Miller H, Wheeler B, Kerruish N Abstract AIMS: Vitamin K prophylaxis represents one of the first healthcare decisions families make for their newborn. Information resources are an important component of this process. This study aimed to identify and analyse written information about vitamin K. METHODS: Resources concerning vitamin K prophylaxis for both parents and health professionals were accessed through tertiary hospitals in New Zealand and Australia, midwives associated with Queen Mary Maternity Centre (Dunedin, New Zealand), antenatal class providers in the Dunedin, New Zealand area, and an online search of Australian and New Zealand government and hospital websites, as well as the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) in the US. These materials were assessed with regard to coverage of information relevant to vitamin K prophylaxis, whether a statement of the recommended option was included, and information concerning parental choice. RESULTS: In Australia, the majority of centres use the Australian Government National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) resource. In New Zealand, eight different resources are in use. There was variation between resources in all aspects, including use of different incidence rates for vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB). No New Zealand resources were available in languages other than English. The resources for health professionals also varied, and the two available New Zealand consensus statements (Ministry of Health and College of Midwives) differed in terms of their main recommendation. CONCLUSIONS: Many different information resources are available regarding vitamin K prophylaxis in New Zealand. Standardisation of such information would be more equitable and would facilitate easier review of content and translation into multiple languages. PMID: 27906918 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Less reduction of psychosocial problems among adolescents with unmet communication needs.

Related Articles
Less reduction of psychosocial problems among adolescents with unmet communication needs. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2017 Apr;26(4):403-412 Authors: Jager M, Reijneveld SA, Almansa J, Metselaar J, Knorth EJ, De Winter AF Abstract Patient-professional communication has been suggested to be a major determinant of treatment outcomes in psychosocial care for children and adolescents. However, the mechanisms involved are largely unknown and no longitudinal studies have been performed. Our aim was, therefore, to assess over the course of 1 year, the impact of patient-centered communication on psychosocial problems of adolescents in psychosocial care, including the routes mediating this impact. We obtained data on 315 adolescents, aged 12-18 years, enrolled in child and adolescent social or mental health care. We assessed patient-centered communication by comparing the needs and experiences of adolescents with regard to three aspects of communication: affective quality, information provision, and shared decision-making. Changes in psychosocial problems comprised those reported by adolescents and their parents between baseline and 1 year thereafter. Potential mediators were treatment adherence, improvement of understanding, and improvement in self-confidence. We found a relationship between unmet needs for affective quality, information provision, and shared decision-making and less reduction of psychosocial problems. The association between the unmet need to share in decision-making and less reduction of psychosocial problems were partially mediated by less improvement in self-confidence (30 %). We found no mediators regarding affective quality and information provision. Our findings confirm that patient-centered communication is a major determinant of treatment outcomes in psychosocial care for adolescents. Professionals should be aware that tailoring their communication to individual patients' needs is vital to the effectiveness of psychosocial care. PMID: 27623817 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Maternal warmth and toddler development: support for transactional models in disadvantaged families.

Related Articles
Maternal warmth and toddler development: support for transactional models in disadvantaged families. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2017 Apr;26(4):497-507 Authors: Girard LC, Doyle O, Tremblay RE Abstract Studies support cognitive and social domains of development as entwined in childhood, however, there is a paucity of investigation into the nature of the mother-child relationship within an interdependence framework. Furthermore, the focus on these processes within families from impoverished communities using frequent assessments in early childhood has been limited. Our objectives were to identify (1) the directional associations between toddler's communication ability and social competence, (2) to establish whether the association between toddler's communication ability and social competence is mediated by maternal warmth, and (3) to establish support for transactional models between toddlers' outcomes and maternal warmth in disadvantaged communities in Ireland. Participants included 173 toddlers and their families enrolled in a prenatally commencing prevention programme. Toddler's communication and social competence were assessed at 12, 18, 24 and 36 months and maternal warmth at 6 and 24 months. Cross-lagged models were estimated examining multiple paths of associations simultaneously. Direct and indirect paths of maternal warmth were also examined. Bi-directional associations were found between communication ability and social competence from 12 to 24 months but not thereafter. Maternal warmth did not significantly mediate these associations, however, support of a transactional model was found with social competence. The results support early positive associations between better communication ability and social competence in the first 2 years, however, they suggest that these associations are no longer present by the third year. The role of maternal warmth in fostering social competencies is important for toddlers and equally important is toddler's level of social competence in eliciting increased maternal warmth. PMID: 27771763 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Social disadvantage and developmental diagnosis in pre-schoolers.

Related Articles
Social disadvantage and developmental diagnosis in pre-schoolers. J Paediatr Child Health. 2017 Apr 11;: Authors: Kayrouz N, Milne SL, McDonald JL Abstract AIM: To explore the association between social disadvantage and developmental diagnoses in pre-school children. METHODS: Between 2012 and 2015, 845 pre-school children were assessed by the Child Assessment Team at Campbelltown Hospital. A social worker interviewed 469 families and these children were eligible for inclusion in the study. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was confirmed in 290 children. Of those without ASD, 72 did not have global developmental delay (GDD) and were excluded from the study. The remaining 107 children with GDD were used as the comparison group. Social risk factors in the two groups were compared using χ (2) tests. Variables with statistical significance were then entered into a logistic regression. RESULTS: After logistic regression, children with ASD were more likely to be male (odds ratio (OR) 3.1, 95% CI 0.195-0.529; P < 0.001) and their parents were more likely to have a clinically significant stress score (OR 1.3, 95% CI 0.334-0.992; P = 0.047). Children with GDD were more likely to live in a disadvantaged suburb (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.042-2.940; P = 0.034), more likely to have a sole parent (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.062-3.082; P = 0.029) and much more likely to have had involvement with child protection services (OR 3.9, 95% CI 2.044-7.416; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Children with GDD without autism were more likely to be disadvantaged and to have had contact with child protection services than children with ASD. This has implications for the assessment, early intervention and support services for children with disabilities and their families. PMID: 28398695 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Supporting Caregivers of Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia via a Smartphone App: A Pilot Study of Usability and Effectiveness.

Related Articles
Supporting Caregivers of Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia via a Smartphone App: A Pilot Study of Usability and Effectiveness. Comput Inform Nurs. 2016 Nov;34(11):520-527 Authors: Wang J, Yao N, Shen M, Zhang X, Wang Y, Liu Y, Geng Z, Yuan C Abstract Smartphone applications are widely used for self-help interventions in adult cancer survivors. However, applications for parents of pediatric cancer patients are limited. We developed an applications to assist parents of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The aim of this study is to evaluate the app's usability and effectiveness in a preliminary way. A stepwise approach and mixed methods were used. The application was initially tested by healthcare providers, and their comments and suggestions were used to develop an updated version. This version was tested by parents of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Comments and nonverbal expressions of parents were recorded during a 2-week pilot test. The qualitative study was followed by a quantitative study using audit log data from the administration portal to understand how parents use the application. Six healthcare providers and 15 parents participated. Parents gained a greater knowledge of leukemia, confidence in caregiving, social support, and information on how to reduce stress. Over usability was rated as stable, useful, simple, and self-explanatory. No software failure occurred. Applications have the potential to support caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. We plan to address limitations and perform an empirical interventional study to examine its clinical effectiveness. PMID: 27385540 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Delivering Knowledge of Stroke to Parents Through Their Children Using a Manga for Stroke Education in Elementary School.

Related Articles
Delivering Knowledge of Stroke to Parents Through Their Children Using a Manga for Stroke Education in Elementary School. J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2017 Feb;26(2):431-437 Authors: Ishigami A, Yokota C, Nishimura K, Ohyama S, Tomari S, Hino T, Arimizu T, Wada S, Toyoda K, Minematsu K Abstract BACKGROUND: School-based intervention would be promising to spread stroke knowledge widely. This study aimed to clarify the effectiveness of our new educational aids that were developed for elementary school children to impart information about stroke to children and their parents in 2 different ways: with or without stroke lessons by a neurologist. METHODS: We enrolled 562 children (aged 11 to 12 years) and their parents (n = 485). The students were divided into 2 groups: 323 received a lesson on stroke by a stroke neurologist without watching an animated cartoon (Group I), and 239 watched an animated cartoon without the lesson (Group II). All of the children took the manga home, and talked about stroke with their parents. Questionnaires on stroke knowledge were administered at baseline (BL), immediately after the lesson (IL), and 3 months (3M) after the lesson. RESULTS: There were significant increases in the adjusted mean scores for risk factors as well as stroke symptoms at 3M in both groups compared with BL scores, although the children in Group I scored significantly better than those in Group II at IL and 3M (P < .05). In both children and parents, the correct answer rates of the FAST mnemonic at 3M were around 90%, with no significant differences between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Stroke education for elementary school children using our educational aids provided knowledge of stroke symptoms to the children as well as their parents even without lessons on stroke, although a better understanding of stroke was obtained from lessons led by stroke neurologists. PMID: 27838177 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Where are the opportunities for an earlier diagnosis of primary intracranial tumours in children and young adults?

Related Articles
Where are the opportunities for an earlier diagnosis of primary intracranial tumours in children and young adults? Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2017 Mar;21(2):388-395 Authors: Chu TP, Shah A, Walker D, Coleman MP Abstract BACKGROUND: Childhood brain tumours have some of the longest time to diagnosis. A timely diagnosis may have a role in reducing anxiety in waiting for a diagnosis and subsequent morbidity and mortality. We investigated where the opportunities for an earlier diagnosis were, and for which anatomical locations this strategy will most likely to be effective. METHODS: A record-linkage cohort study of patients diagnosed aged 0-24 years with a primary intracranial tumour between 1989 and 2006 in England, using records from the National Cancer Registry linked to hospital admission records from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES, 1997-2006) and primary care consultation records from Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD, 1989-2006). Relevant neurological presentations were extracted from HES and CPRD. Temporal changes in presentation rates were estimated in generalised additive models. RESULTS: Frequency of presentation began to increase six months before diagnosis in primary care and three months before diagnosis in hospital. Supratentorial and midline tumours had the longest presentation history before diagnosis. Peri-ventricular tumours presented frequently in hospital (rate ratio = 1.29 vs supratentorial tumours; 95% CI = 1.12-1.48) or as an emergency (1.24; 1.01-1.51), and in primary care (1.12; 0.62-1.85). CONCLUSIONS: Opportunities for an earlier diagnosis are greater in supratentorial, midline or cranial nerve tumours, which have a longer presentation history than peri-ventricular, cerebellar or brainstem tumours. Common features before diagnosis include headache, convulsions, and growth or endocrine disorders. Focal neurological deficits are uncommon and emerge late in the pre-diagnosis period. PMID: 27840025 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Do developmental milestones at 4, 8, 12 and 24 months predict IQ at 5-6 years old? Results of the EDEN mother-child cohort.

Related Articles
Do developmental milestones at 4, 8, 12 and 24 months predict IQ at 5-6 years old? Results of the EDEN mother-child cohort. Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2017 Mar;21(2):272-279 Authors: Peyre H, Charkaluk ML, Forhan A, Heude B, Ramus F, EDEN Mother–Child Cohort Study Group Abstract RATIONALE: The present study aims: (i) to determine how well developmental milestones at 4, 8, 12 and 24 months may predict IQ at 5-6 years old, (ii) to identify cognitive domains during the first two years that best predict later IQ and (iii) to determine whether children with IQ in the normal range at 5-6 years old may differ from disabled (IQ < 70) and gifted children (IQ > 130) with regard to their early cognitive development. METHOD: The main developmental milestones were collected through self-administered questionnaires rated by parents at 4, 8, 12 and 24 months and through parental questionnaires administered by a trained interviewer and questionnaires completed following a medical examination at 12 months. These questionnaires were derived from the Brunet-Lézine Psychomotor Development Scale and they addressed several cognitive domains (gross and fine motor skills, language and socialization). RESULTS: (i) Developmental milestones predict a substantial part of the later IQ variance from 24 months (R(2) ∼ 20%). (ii) Early language skills more strongly predict later IQ than the other cognitive domains. (iii) Several cognitive domains, but particularly language skills, predict disabled children at 5-6 years old (from the age of 8 months) and gifted children (from the age of 12 months). DISCUSSION: The present study provides valuable information for early developmental assessment and could contribute to a better understanding of intellectual development. PMID: 27889381 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Reliability and validity of DS-ADHD: A decision support system on attention deficit hyperactivity disorders.

Related Articles
Reliability and validity of DS-ADHD: A decision support system on attention deficit hyperactivity disorders. Comput Methods Programs Biomed. 2017 Mar;140:241-248 Authors: Chu KC, Huang YS, Tseng CF, Huang HJ, Wang CH, Tai HY Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study is to examine the reliability of the clinical use of the self-built decision support system, diagnosis-supported attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (DS-ADHD), in an effort to develop the DS-ADHD system, by probing into the development of indicating patterns of past screening support systems for ADHD. METHODS: The study collected data based on 107 subjects, who were divided into two groups, non-ADHD and ADHD, based on the doctor's determination, using the DSM-IV diagnostic standards. The two groups then underwent Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA) and DS-ADHD testing. The survey and testing results underwent one-way ANOVA and split-half method statistical analysis, in order to further understand whether there were any differences between the DS-ADHD and the identification tools used in today's clinical trials. RESULTS: The results of the study are as follows: 1) The ROC area between the TOVA and the clinical identification rate is 0.787 (95% confidence interval: 0.701-0.872); 2) The ROC area between the DS-ADHD and the clinical identification rate is 0.867 (95% confidence interval: 0.801-0.933). CONCLUSIONS: The study results show that DS-ADHD has the characteristics of screening for ADHD, based on its reliability and validity. It does not display any statistical differences when compared with TOVA systems that are currently on the market. However, the system is more effective and the accuracy rate is better than TOVA. It is a good tool to screen ADHD not only in Chinese children, but also in western countries. PMID: 28254080 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Ethical considerations for children’s participation in data collection activities during humanitarian emergencies: A Delphi review.

Related Articles
Ethical considerations for children's participation in data collection activities during humanitarian emergencies: A Delphi review. Confl Health. 2017;11:5 Authors: Bennouna C, Mansourian H, Stark L Abstract BACKGROUND: Children's right to participate in data collection during emergencies has been widely recognized by humanitarian actors. However, participation in such activities can expose children to risk. Tensions have been noted between the right to participate and other principles, such as the imperative to 'do no harm.' With little evidence to inform guidance on addressing this tension, our study sought to identify expert consensus on whether and how children participate in emergency-related data collection activities. METHODS: We employed a three-round Delphi technique with a purposive sample of 52 child protection specialists. Respondents answered two open-ended questions in round one. A thematic analysis of responses generated a set of unique statements addressing the study questions. In the second round, respondents rated each statement on a five-point scale. In the final round, respondents reviewed the group's average ratings for each statement with the option to revise their own ratings. A statement was said to have reached clear consensus when at least 90% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the statement. RESULTS: A total of 124 statements and 14 themes emerged from the thematic analysis, with 46.0% of statements reaching clear consensus in the third round. Respondents strongly supported children's right to participate in data collection in humanitarian settings, while also recognizing that protecting children from harm may "over-ride" the participation principle in some contexts. Respondents identified capacity and contextual considerations as important factors influencing participation decisions, though they sometimes disagreed about how these factors should determine participation. Respondents also considered the role of individual child factors and the presence of caregivers in selecting child participants, and proposed best practice approaches for securing children's safe and meaningful participation. CONCLUSIONS: With almost half of statements reaching clear consensus, these findings reflect broad agreement within the sector about engaging children in data collection in emergencies. At the same time, points of ongoing debate around how to factor different risks into child participation decisions may indicate discordant practice. Further reflection is needed around how factors such as the phase of emergency, the existence of basic services, and cultural beliefs should influence whether and how children participate. PMID: 28352291 [PubMed - in process]

Universal Mandatory Reporting Policies and the Odds of Identifying Child Physical Abuse.

Related Articles
Universal Mandatory Reporting Policies and the Odds of Identifying Child Physical Abuse. Am J Public Health. 2017 Mar 21;:e1-e8 Authors: Ho GW, Gross DA, Bettencourt A Abstract OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationships between universal mandatory reporting (UMR), child physical abuse reporting, and the moderating effect of UMR on physical abuse report outcomes by report source. METHODS: We used a national data set of 204 414 children reported for physical abuse in 2013 to compare rates of total and confirmed reports by states or territories with and without UMR. We estimated odds and predicted probabilities of confirming a physical abuse report made by professional versus nonprofessional reporters, accounting for the moderating effect of UMR and individual-level characteristics. RESULTS: Rates of total and confirmed physical abuse reports did not differ by UMR status. Nonprofessionals were more likely to make reports in UMR states compared with states without UMR. Probability of making a confirmed report was significantly lower under UMR; this effect almost doubled for nonprofessionals compared with professional reporters. CONCLUSIONS: Universal mandatory reporting may not be the answer for strengthening the protection of children victimized by physical abuse. Implementation of child protection policies must be exercised according to evidence to exert the fullest impact and benefit of these laws. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print March 21, 2017: e1-e8. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2017.303667). PMID: 28323475 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Redrawing the line: An exploration of how lay people construct child neglect.

Related Articles
Redrawing the line: An exploration of how lay people construct child neglect. Child Abuse Negl. 2017 Apr 05;68:11-24 Authors: Williams SE Abstract While there has been an increasing professional and political focus on the prevalence and harmfulness of child neglect, little has been done to explore what child neglect means outside child protection circles. This qualitative study explores lay constructions of child neglect by thematically analyzing focus group discussions between 46 self-defined 'lay' people in England. Participants viewed neglect as extremely damaging for children and as arising when children's physical, emotional, training and supervisory needs were unmet due to abnormal parental behavior. Children with unmet needs were positioned as deprived, unloved, uncontrolled and escaping. They were only positioned as neglected when failure to meet their needs was attributable to a lack of parental knowledge and skill (clueless parents), a lack of appropriate parental disposition (underinvested parents) or both (unsuitable parents). 'Normal' parents - those with the appropriate parental disposition, skills and knowledge - who failed to meet their children's needs were not seen as neglectful but rather as overburdened. As 'normal parenting' has fragmented in late modernity, society wide consensus on child neglect was felt by participants to have retreated to child protection definitions, alienating lay understandings. If child neglect really is 'everybody's business', then it is important that lay people are included in forging new definitions of and responses to meeting the needs of children. PMID: 28391074 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Screening for early-onset invasive group B Streptococcal disease in neonates in an Irish hospital (2001-2014): a retrospective audit.

Related Articles
Screening for early-onset invasive group B Streptococcal disease in neonates in an Irish hospital (2001-2014): a retrospective audit. Infect Dis (Lond). 2017 Jun;49(6):466-470 Authors: Nielsen M, Sheikh N, Fitzgerald E, Meehan M, LeBlanc D, Eogan M, El-Khuffash A, Drew RJ Abstract Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the most common cause of early-onset neonatal sepsis and meningitis. In babies with no clinical suspicion of infection, who are at risk of early-onset invasive disease based on maternal risk factors, blood cultures are taken to detect bacteraemia. In our institution, lumbar punctures are performed in infants with clinical signs of sepsis but not in infants who are well at the time of screening. Between 2001 and 2014, there were 112,361 live births weighing >500 g, of whom 13,959 (12.4%) infants had a blood culture taken on the first or second day of life, and 1971 (14.1%) of these infants had lumbar punctures on these first two days of life. Fifty-three cases of early-onset GBS disease were identified. Only three patients with invasive GBS disease had no clinical suspicion for sepsis at the time of testing. Thus, the number of blood cultures taken to detect one case of GBS bacteraemia in an infant who is well at the time of testing was 3996. PMID: 28276804 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Mental Health Visits: Examining Socio-demographic and Diagnosis Trends in the Emergency Department by the Pediatric Population.

Related Articles
Mental Health Visits: Examining Socio-demographic and Diagnosis Trends in the Emergency Department by the Pediatric Population. Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2017 Mar 17;: Authors: Holder SM, Rogers K, Peterson E, Ochonma C Abstract The emergency department (ED) is increasingly being used for mental health visits by children and adolescents. It is estimated that 21-23% of youth have a diagnosable psychiatric or substance use disorder. Using data from the ED of a tertiary medical center, we examined trends in mental health diagnoses over a 5-year period. In school age children the most prevalent diagnoses were anxiety disorders (28.4%); disorders first usually diagnosed in infancy, childhood, or adolescence (26.5%), and mood disorders (18.6%). High school students were more likely to visit the ED for anxiety disorders (30%). Females (34.5%) presented more for anxiety disorders compared to males (22.7%). Mental health visits and diagnoses were higher during school months (September-May) and lower in the summer months (June-August). The diagnosis trends identified in this study have clinical implications that can contribute to evidence-based restructuring of mental health resources and screenings. PMID: 28315109 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Explaining culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) parents’ access of healthcare services for developmental surveillance and anticipatory guidance: qualitative findings from the ‘Watch Me Grow’ study.

Related Articles
Explaining culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) parents' access of healthcare services for developmental surveillance and anticipatory guidance: qualitative findings from the 'Watch Me Grow' study. BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Mar 22;17(1):228 Authors: Garg P, Ha MT, Eastwood J, Harvey S, Woolfenden S, Murphy E, Dissanayake C, Jalaludin B, Williams K, McKenzie A, Einfeld S, Silove N, Short K, Eapen V Abstract BACKGROUND: Regular health visits for parents with young children provide an opportunity for developmental surveillance and anticipatory guidance regarding common childhood problems and help to achieve optimal developmental progress prior to school entry. However, there are few published reports from Australian culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities exploring parents' experiences for accessing child health surveillance programs. This paper aims to describe and explain parental experiences for accessing developmental surveillance and anticipatory guidance for children. METHODS: Qualitative data was obtained from 6 focus groups (33 parents) and seven in-depth interviews of CALD parents recruited from an area of relative disadvantage in Sydney. Thematic analysis of data was conducted using an ecological framework. RESULTS: An overarching theme of "awareness-beliefs-choices" was found to explain parents' experiences of accessing primary health care services for children. "Awareness" situated within the meso-and macro-systems explained parents knowledge of where and what primary health services were available to access for their children. Opportunities for families to obtain this information existed at the time of birth in Australian hospitals, but for newly arrived immigrants with young children, community linkages with family and friends, and general practitioner (GPs) were most important. "Beliefs" situated within the microsystems included parents' understanding of their children's development, in particular what they considered to be "normal" or "abnormal". Parental "choices", situated within meso-systems and chronosystems, related to their choices of service providers, which were based on the proximity, continuity, purpose of visit, language spoken by the provider and past experience of a service. CONCLUSIONS: CALD parents have diverse experiences with primary health care providers which are influenced by their awareness of available services in the context of their duration of stay in Australia. The role of the general practitioner, with language concordance, suggests the importance of diversity within the primary care health workforce in this region. There is a need for ongoing cultural competence training of health professionals and provisions need to be made to support frequent use of interpreters at general practices in Australia. PMID: 28330490 [PubMed - in process]

Construct validity and responsiveness of Movakic: An instrument for the evaluation of motor abilities in children with severe multiple disabilities.

Related Articles
Construct validity and responsiveness of Movakic: An instrument for the evaluation of motor abilities in children with severe multiple disabilities. Res Dev Disabil. 2016 Dec;59:194-201 Authors: Mensch SM, Echteld MA, Evenhuis HM, Rameckers EA Abstract Movakic is a newly developed instrument for measurement of motor abilities in children with severe multiple disabilities, with a satisfactory feasibility and content validity and good inter-observer and test-retest reliability. The objective of this study was to investigate its construct validity and responsiveness to change. Sixty children with severe multiple disabilities (mean age 7.7 years, range 2-16) were measured using Movakic six times during 18 months. Construct validity was assessed by correlating Movakic scores with expert judgment. In order to assess responsiveness, scores during 3-months intervals were compared (mean score-changes and intraclass correlations) during which some children experienced meaningful events influencing motor abilities and during which others experienced no such event. Forty-five percent of children had a lower cognitive development level than 6-month, 52% had Gross Motor Function Classification System level V and 37% had level IV. For 27 children all measurements were completed, six children dropped out. Construct validity was good (r=0.50-0.71). Responsiveness was demonstrated by significantly larger score changes after events than when such events did not occur. Movakic is a valid instrument for measuring motor abilities in children with severe multiple disabilities. Results suggest responsiveness to change in motor abilities after meaningful events. PMID: 27627682 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The Role of Teen Mothers’ Support Relationships in Maintenance of Contraceptive Use.

Related Articles
The Role of Teen Mothers' Support Relationships in Maintenance of Contraceptive Use. J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2017 Feb;30(1):35-40 Authors: Quinn DA, Mitchell SJ, Lewin A Abstract STUDY OBJECTIVE: To explore interpersonal factors associated with maintaining contraceptive use over time among urban, African American teen mothers. DESIGN: Longitudinal study, 2011-2015. SETTING: Six pediatric primary care sites in the same city, all of which primarily serve urban, low-income, African American families. PARTICIPANTS: Teen mothers accessing health services for their child at one of the six study sites. INTERVENTIONS: The current study was a secondary data analysis of data that were collected as part of a patient-centered medical home model intervention, that compared a group of teen mothers and their children who were participants in the intervention with mother-child dyads who were enrolled in standard community-based pediatric primary care. Structured interviews were conducted with teen mothers at baseline/enrollment, when their children were, on average, 3 months old, and again 12 months later. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Maintenance of contraceptive use over time. RESULTS: Teen mothers who perceived any tangible support from their own mothers were significantly less likely to maintain contraceptive use over time (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = .27). However, teens who perceived any emotional support from their own mothers were nearly four times more likely to maintain contraceptive use (AOR = 3.74). Teens who lived with their own mothers were more than 5 times more likely to maintain contraceptive use over time (AOR = 5.49). CONCLUSION: To better understand contraceptive discontinuation and thus to prevent repeat pregnancies among teen mothers, it might be necessary to further examine the role of support relationships in teen mothers' contraceptive decision-making. Secondary pregnancy prevention programs should include key support persons. PMID: 27565409 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Topical administration of hyaluronic acid in children with recurrent or chronic middle ear inflammations.

Related Articles
Topical administration of hyaluronic acid in children with recurrent or chronic middle ear inflammations. Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol. 2016 Sep;29(3):438-42 Authors: Torretta S, Marchisio P, Rinaldi V, Gaffuri M, Pascariello C, Drago L, Baggi E, Pignataro L Abstract Hyaluronic acid (HA) treatment has been successfully performed in patients with recurrent upper airway infections or rhinitis. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of the topical nasal administration of an HA-based compound by investigating its effects in children with recurrent or chronic middle ear inflammations and chronic adenoiditis. A prospective, single-blind, 1:1 randomised controlled study was performed to compare otoscopy, tympanometry and pure-tone audiometry in children which received the daily topical administration of normal 0.9% sodium chloride saline solution (control group) or 9 mg of sodium hyaluronate in 3 mL of a 0.9% sodium saline solution. The final analysis was based on 116 children (49.1% boys; mean age, 62.9 ± 17.9 months): 58 in the control group and 58 in the study group. At the end of follow-up, the prevalence of patients with impaired otoscopy was significantly lower in the study group (P value = 0.024) compared to baseline but not in the control group. In comparison with baseline, the prevalence of patients with impaired tympanometry at the end of the follow-up period was significantly lower in the study group (P value = 0.047) but not in the control group. The reduction in the prevalence of patients with conductive hearing loss (CHL) (P value = 0.008) and those with moderate CHL (P value = 0.048) was significant in the study group, but not in the control group. The mean auditory threshold had also significantly improved by the end of treatment in the study group (P value = 0.004) but not in the control group. Our findings confirm the safety of intermittent treatment with a topical nasal sodium hyaluronate solution and are the first to document its beneficial effect on clinical and audiological outcomes in children with recurrent or chronic middle ear inflammations associated with chronic adenoiditis. PMID: 27481884 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Late effects of chemotherapeutic agents on renal function in childhood cancer survivors: a review of the literature.

Related Articles
Late effects of chemotherapeutic agents on renal function in childhood cancer survivors: a review of the literature. Ir J Med Sci. 2017 Feb;186(1):49-55 Authors: O'Sullivan D Abstract BACKGROUND: Survival outcomes for childhood cancers have significantly improved. As more children are now surviving into adulthood, knowledge of the long-term effects of childhood cancer treatments has become the focus of research. AIM: To determine what is known about the incidence of renal function impairment in childhood cancer survivors and to determine what is known about risk factors for developing renal function impairment following childhood cancer treatment. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was preformed to identify studies that investigated renal dysfunction in patients who were diagnosed with childhood cancer and treated with potentially nephrotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. Potentially nephrotoxic chemotherapeutic agents identified in the selection criteria include ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin and methotrexate. RESULTS: 15 papers met the inclusion criteria. Renal function impairment was reported in 15 of 15 studies included in this literature review. The incidence of ifosfamide induced nephrotoxicity varied from 1 to 50 %. This variation may be due to the heterogeneity of reported outcome measurements. Treatment with cisplatin and carboplatin was associated with hypomagnesemia. The prevalence of hypomagnesemia varied from 7 to 29 %. This variation may be due to diversity of treatment protocols. The incidence of renal dysfunction following treatment with methotrexate was reported as 1.8 % and completely reversible. CONCLUSION: As more childhood cancer survivors are reaching adulthood, a new niche of cancer research has emerged. Researchers are now investigating the late effects due to cytotoxic treatments. Renal function impairment is a potential late effect of treatment with nephrotoxic chemotherapeutic agents including ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin and methotrexate. PMID: 27339643 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Outcome of pregnancy in women diagnosed with idiopathic polyhydramnios.

Related Articles
Outcome of pregnancy in women diagnosed with idiopathic polyhydramnios. Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2017 Feb;57(1):57-62 Authors: Khan S, Donnelly J Abstract INTRODUCTION: Polyhydramnios is present in approximately 2% of pregnancies and it has been associated with a variety of adverse pregnancy outcomes. OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between polyhydramnios and adverse pregnancy outcomes. METHODS: This was a retrospective case control study of 288 singleton pregnancies delivered in the Rotunda Hospital, Dublin, between 2013 and 2014. Polyhydramnios was defined as: (i) amniotic fluid index (AFI) ≥ 25 cm; (ii) maximal vertical pocket (MVP) of ≥8 cm; and (iii) a gestational age-specific threshold for AFI. Demographic information, obstetric and neonatal outcomes were obtained by review of hospital databases. Exclusion criteria included gestational or pre-existing diabetes, multiple pregnancy, carrying a fetus with structural or chromosomal abnormalities, Rhesus factor isoimmunisation, and TORCH screen positive. Outcomes were compared with outcomes of those without polyhydramnios. RESULTS: A total of 8798 deliveries occurred during the study period. The frequency of polyhydramnios was 1.6%. One hundred and forty-four women were selected in each group. There was no significant difference in preterm deliveries, low birth weight, low Apgar score at one minute and five minutes and perinatal mortality. However, increase in caesarean delivery rate (43.1% vs 21.5%), number of fetal distresses (17.4% vs 6.9%) and number of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions (17.4% vs 4.9%) were observed in our study. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, idiopathic polyhydramnios is associated with specific adverse outcomes, such as higher rate of caesarean delivery, fetal distress and NICU admissions. Therefore, close surveillance of these pregnancies is required, especially near term. PMID: 28251633 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Where to from here? The treatment of impetigo in children as resistance to fusidic acid emerges.

Related Articles
Where to from here? The treatment of impetigo in children as resistance to fusidic acid emerges. N Z Med J. 2016 Oct 14;129(1443):77-83 Authors: Vogel A, Lennon D, Best E, Leversha A Abstract Admissions for skin and soft-tissue infections have been increasing steadily in children and in the general population. Concerns have been raised recently about the increasing widespread use of topical fusidic acid and concurrent increase of fusidic acid-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Fusidic acid resistance and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are both more prevalent in youngest age group (<5 year-olds) and particularly in the North island. In New Zealand, fusidic acid is recommended for treatment of minor impetigo and is the only fully-funded topical antibiotic. The evidence base for alternative treatment strategies for mild impetigo is limited. Most children with impetigo in the current Counties Manukau skin and sore throat schools programme received care with wound management with only a few requiring escalation. An upcoming randomised controlled trial comparing topical hydrogen peroxide cream, topical fusidic acid and wound management only (clean and cover) will help provide evidence about the effectiveness of alternative treatments in the New Zealand setting. PMID: 27736855 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Pregnancy and epilepsy; meeting the challenges over the last 25 years: The rise of the pregnancy registries.

Related Articles
Pregnancy and epilepsy; meeting the challenges over the last 25 years: The rise of the pregnancy registries. Seizure. 2017 Jan;44:162-168 Authors: Kinney MO, Craig JJ Abstract PURPOSE: Women with epilepsy (WWE), of all ages, have much to consider if their care is to be optimised and they are not to be denied the choices open to those without epilepsy. At no time is this more critical than during their child-bearing years when treatment decisions are complex. METHODS: In this article we will provide a personal commentary and review of the pertinent literature on how the management of WWE of childbearing years has changed over the last 25 years. As well as reflecting on the state of knowledge at the start of the 1990s and the approach to managing WWE at this time, we will demonstrate that in addition to much more information now being available that there has also been an attempt to standardise how WWE should be managed. RESULTS: As a means of achieving this increase in knowledge and standardisation of care, we argue that the various pregnancy registries have played a significant part in these positive developments. As vehicles for collecting clinically relevant data, they have provided information that has helped empower women and their health care providers to make sound clinical decisions, as well as highlighting the difficulties and unknowns. CONCLUSIONS: Still being active the pregnancy registries maintain a continued focus on the relevant issues relating to WWE. PMID: 27839978 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The impact of preterm birth <37 weeks on parents and families: a cross-sectional study in the 2 years after discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit.

Related Articles
The impact of preterm birth <37 weeks on parents and families: a cross-sectional study in the 2 years after discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit. Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2017 Feb 16;15(1):38 Authors: Lakshmanan A, Agni M, Lieu T, Fleegler E, Kipke M, Friedlich PS, McCormick MC, Belfort MB Abstract BACKGROUND: Little is known about the quality of life of parents and families of preterm infants after discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Our aims were (1) to describe the impact of preterm birth on parents and families and (2) and to identify potentially modifiable determinants of parent and family impact. METHODS: We surveyed 196 parents of preterm infants <24 months corrected age in 3 specialty clinics (82% response rate). Primary outcomes were: (1) the Impact on Family Scale total score; and (2) the Infant Toddler Quality of Life parent emotion and (3) time limitations scores. Potentially modifiable factors were use of community-based services, financial burdens, and health-related social problems. We estimated associations of potentially modifiable factors with outcomes, adjusting for socio-demographic and infant characteristics using linear regression. RESULTS: Median (inter-quartile range) infant gestational age was 28 (26-31) weeks. Higher Impact on Family scores (indicating worse effects on family functioning) were associated with taking ≥3 unpaid hours/week off from work, increased debt, financial worry, unsafe home environment and social isolation. Lower parent emotion scores (indicating greater impact on the parent) were also associated with social isolation and unpaid time off from work. Lower parent time limitations scores were associated with social isolation, unpaid time off from work, financial worry, and an unsafe home environment. In contrast, higher parent time limitations scores (indicating less impact) were associated with enrollment in early intervention and Medicaid. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions to reduce social isolation, lessen financial burden, improve home safety, and increase enrollment in early intervention and Medicaid all have the potential to lessen the impact of preterm birth on parents and families. PMID: 28209168 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Determining rates of overweight and obese status in children using electronic medical records: Cross-sectional study.

Related Articles
Determining rates of overweight and obese status in children using electronic medical records: Cross-sectional study. Can Fam Physician. 2017 Feb;63(2):e114-e122 Authors: Birken CS, Tu K, Oud W, Carsley S, Hanna M, Lebovic G, Guttmann A Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of overweight and obese status in children by age, sex, and visit type, using data from EMRALD(®) (Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database). DESIGN: Heights and weights were abstracted for children 0 to 19 years of age who had at least one well-child visit from January 2010 to December 2011. Using the most recent visit, the proportions and 95% CIs of patients defined as overweight and obese were compared by age group, sex, and visit type using the World Health Organization growth reference standards. SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Children 0 to 19 years of age who were rostered to a primary care physician participating in EMRALD and had at least one well-child visit from January 2010 to December 2011. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion and 95% CI of children with overweight and obese status by age group; proportion of children with overweight and obese status by sex (with male sex as the referent) within each age group; and proportion of children with overweight and obese status at the most recent well-child visit type compared with other visit types by age group. RESULTS: There were 28 083 well-child visits during this period. For children who attended well-child visits, 84.7% of visits had both a height and weight documented. Obesity rates were significantly higher in 1- to 4-year-olds compared with children younger than 1 (6.1% vs 2.3%; P < .001), and in 10- to 14-year-olds compared with 5- to 9-year-olds (12.0% vs 9.0%; P < .05). Both 1- to 4-year-old boys (7.2% vs 4.9%; P < .01) and 10- to 14-year-old boys (14.5% vs 9.6%; P < .05) had higher obesity rates compared with girls. Rates of overweight and obese status were lower using data from well-child visits compared with other visits. CONCLUSION: Electronic medical records might be useful to conduct population-based surveillance of overweight or obese status in children. Methodologic standards, however, should be developed. PMID: 28209703 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Emollients and moisturisers for eczema

Cochrane library logo

Authors: van Zuuren EJ, Fedorowicz Z, Christensen R, Lavrijsen A, Arents BWM

Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2017, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD012119. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD012119.pub2.

Autism Spectrum Disorder: Primary Care Principles.

Related Articles
Autism Spectrum Disorder: Primary Care Principles. Am Fam Physician. 2016 Dec 15;94(12):972-979 Authors: Sanchack KE, Thomas CA Abstract Autism spectrum disorder is characterized by difficulty with social communication and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interest, or activities. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed., created an umbrella diagnosis that includes several previously separate conditions: autistic disorder, Asperger syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. There is insufficient evidence to recommend screening for autism spectrum disorder in children 18 to 30 months of age in whom the disorder is not suspected; however, there is a growing body of evidence that early intensive behavioral intervention based on applied behavior analysis improves cognitive ability, language, and adaptive skills. Therefore, early identification of autism spectrum disorder is important, and experts recommend the use of a validated screening tool at 18- and 24-month well-child visits. Medications can be used as adjunctive treatment for maladaptive behaviors and comorbid psychiatric conditions, but there is no single medical therapy that is effective for all symptoms of autism spectrum disorder. Prognosis is heavily affected by the severity of diagnosis and the presence of intellectual disability. Children with optimal outcomes receive earlier, more intensive behavioral interventions and less pharmacologic treatment. PMID: 28075089 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Frenotomy for tongue-tie in newborn infants

Cochrane library logo

Authors: O'Shea JE, Foster JP, O'Donnell CPF, Breathnach D, Jacobs SE, Todd DA, Davis PG.

Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2017, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD011065. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011065.pub2.

Growth and nutritional risk in children with developmental delay.

Related Articles
Growth and nutritional risk in children with developmental delay. Ir J Med Sci. 2016 Nov;185(4):839-846 Authors: Malone C, Sharif F, Glennon-Slattery C Abstract INTRODUCTION: Nutritional risk impacts outcome in developmental delay. The main objectives were to identify the incidence and factors contributing to growth faltering. METHODS: Clinical data review was completed for 500 patients with developmental delay accepted to an Early Intervention service. Data was collected using the standardised parent nutrition screening checklist prior to and at time of initial dietary assessment. Data was compared to nutritional assessment data, GOSH and FSAI dietary guidelines. Weight category was determined using RCPCH growth and BMI charts. Statistical analysis was conducted using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 (IBM Statistics 20.0). RESULTS: Nutritional risk was identified in 48.6 %. Weight categories were growth faltering (13.5 %), underweight (7.7 %), overweight (8.4 %) and obesity (4.3 %) at initial assessment. Growth faltering was correlated with age <1 year (p = 0.000) and with gestational age (p = 0.017) with highest rates identified in those born 32-36 weeks (3.6 %). Weight category was associated with introduction of solids pre 17 weeks recommendation (10.1 %), ANOVA demonstrating significance (P = 0.013). There was poor parental recognition of nutritional risk in 22.7 % of those assessed. Nutritional difficulties were common: 4.2 % were enterally fed, 7.7 % were on prescribed nutritional supplements, 29.1 % (n = 121) had feeding difficulties and 13.9 % (n = 58) had behavioural feeding difficulties. Iron intake did not meet the recommended intake in 20.9 % (n = 87), calcium in 4.5 % (n = 19). The prevalence of constipation was 21.6, 11.8 % of whom required medical management. CONCLUSIONS: Developmental delay predisposes to nutritional deficits which influence outcome. Screening, assessment and timely interventions are warranted to prevent poorer developmental outcomes. PMID: 26573207 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Preparing young people for future decision-making about cancer risk in families affected or at risk from hereditary breast cancer: A qualitative interview study.

Related Articles
Preparing young people for future decision-making about cancer risk in families affected or at risk from hereditary breast cancer: A qualitative interview study. Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2016 Dec;25:9-15 Authors: Rowland E, Plumridge G, Considine AM, Metcalfe A Abstract PURPOSE: Women carrying the mutated BRCA gene, have approximately an 80% life-time risk of developing breast cancer with 50% risk of their children inheriting the gene mutation. Many parents find it difficult to know when and how to disclose this information to their children and how such disclosure might affect their child's future decision-making. METHOD: This study explored the communication of genetic risk information in families using qualitative semi-structured interviews conducted with parents, children (7-11years) and young people (12-18years) affected or at risk from a BRCA gene mutation. Thematic analysis was applied to coded transcripts producing four themes; family communication, perception of cancer risks, risk management strategies and impact of genetic risk communication in children and young people's decision making. RESULTS: Twenty-seven individuals from 11 families took part, recruited through purposive sampling techniques. Cancer risk caused by a BRCA gene mutation induced a sense of fear in parents about their children's future. As a result, parents with hereditary breast cancer disclosed limited information about the risks associated with prophylactic surgery and/or the psychological and emotional impacts of surgery on body image. This had implications to children and young people's perceptions of prophylactic procedures, which were already influenced by cultural understandings of the 'desirable body' and increasing acceptance and proliferation cosmetic surgery. CONCLUSION: Lack of risk management information and the acculturation of cosmetic surgery combined to limit children and young people's understanding of the impact of hereditary breast cancer; reducing their ability to actualise the physiological, psychological and emotional consequences of surgery. PMID: 27865258 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Environmental and individual attributes associated with child maltreatment resulting in hospitalization or death.

Related Articles
Environmental and individual attributes associated with child maltreatment resulting in hospitalization or death. Child Abuse Negl. 2017 Mar 02;67:119-136 Authors: Thurston H, Freisthler B, Bell J, Tancredi D, Romano PS, Miyamoto S, Joseph JG Abstract Maltreatment continues to be a leading cause of death for young children. Researchers are beginning to uncover which neighborhood attributes may be associated with maltreatment outcomes. However, few studies have been able to explore these influences while controlling for individual family attributes, and none have been able to parse out the most severe outcomes-injuries resulting in hospitalization or death. This study utilizes a retrospective, case-control design on a dataset containing both individual and environmental level attributes of children who have been hospitalized or died due to maltreatment to explore the relative influence of attributes inside and outside the household walls. Binary conditional logistic regression was used to model the outcome as a function of the individual and environmental level predictors. Separate analyses also separated the outcome by manner of maltreatment: abuse or neglect. Finally, a sub-analysis included protective predictors representing access to supportive resources. Findings indicate that neighborhood attributes were similar for both cases and controls, except in the neglect only model, wherein impoverishment was associated with higher odds of serious maltreatment. Dense housing increased risk in all models except the neglect only model. In a sub-analysis, distance to Family Resource Centers was inversely related to serious maltreatment. In all models, variables representing more extreme intervention and/or removal of the victim and/or perpetrator from the home (foster care or criminal court involvement) were negatively associated with the risk of becoming a case. Medi-Cal insurance eligibility of a child was also negatively associated with becoming a case. Government interventions may be playing a critical role in child protection. More research is needed to ascertain how these interventions assert their influence. PMID: 28254689 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Defining reasonable force: Does it advance child protection?

Related Articles
Defining reasonable force: Does it advance child protection? Child Abuse Negl. 2017 Feb 28;: Authors: Durrant JE, Fallon B, Lefebvre R, Allan K Abstract Fifty-two countries have abolished all physical punishment of children, yet Canada has retained its criminal defense to 'reasonable' corrective force. In 2004, Canada's Supreme Court attempted to set limits on punitive acts that can be considered reasonable under the law. In the present study, we examined the validity of these limits. If the court's limits provide adequate protection to children, most substantiated child maltreatment cases should exceed those limits. We operationalized each limit and applied it to a provincially representative sample of substantiated child physical maltreatment cases. We found that the majority of substantiated physical abuse cases fell within each of the court's limits. In more than one in four substantiated physical abuse cases, not even one of the court's limits was exceeded. The best predictor of whether a report was substantiated was whether spanking was typical in the child's home. The findings suggest that: abolition of physical punishment would provide greater protection to children than attempts to set limits on its use. PMID: 28258758 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Training on domestic violence and child safeguarding in general practice: a mixed method evaluation of a pilot intervention.

Related Articles
Training on domestic violence and child safeguarding in general practice: a mixed method evaluation of a pilot intervention. BMC Fam Pract. 2017 Mar 04;18(1):33 Authors: Lewis NV, Larkins C, Stanley N, Szilassy E, Turner W, Drinkwater J, Feder GS Abstract BACKGROUND: Children's exposure to domestic violence is a type of child maltreatment, yet many general practice clinicians remain uncertain of their child safeguarding responsibilities in the context of domestic violence. We developed an evidence-based pilot training on domestic violence and child safeguarding for general practice teams. The aim of this study was to test and evaluate its feasibility, acceptability and the direction of change in short-term outcome measures. METHODS: We used a mixed method design which included a pre-post questionnaire survey, qualitative analysis of free-text comments, training observations, and post-training interviews with trainers and participants. The questionnaire survey used a validated scale to measure participants' knowledge, confidence/ self-efficacy, and beliefs/ attitudes towards domestic violence and child safeguarding in the context of domestic violence. RESULTS: Eleven UK general practices were recruited (response rate 55%) and 88 clinicians attended the pilot training. Thirty-seven participants (42%) completed all pre-post questionnaires and nine were interviewed. All training sessions were observed. All six trainers were interviewed. General practice clinicians valued the training materials and teaching styles, opportunities for reflection and delivery by local trainers from both health and children's social services. The training elicited positive changes in total outcome score and knowledge and confidence/ self-efficacy sub scores which remained at 3-month follow up. However, the mean sub score of beliefs and attitudes did not change and the qualitative results were mixed. Two interviewees described changes in their clinical practice. Participants' suggestions for improving the training included incorporating more ethnic and class diversity in the material, using cases with multiple socio economic disadvantages, and addressing multi-agency collaboration in the context of changing and under-resourced services for children. CONCLUSIONS: The pilot training for general practice on child safeguarding in the context of domestic violence was feasible and acceptable. It elicited positive changes in clinicians' knowledge and confidence/ self-esteem. The extent to which clinical behaviour changed is unclear, but there are indications of changes in practice by some clinicians. The pilot training requires further refinement and evaluation before implementation. PMID: 28259143 [PubMed - in process]

Screening for Child Sexual Exploitation in Online Sexual Health Services: An Exploratory Study of Expert Views.

Related Articles
Screening for Child Sexual Exploitation in Online Sexual Health Services: An Exploratory Study of Expert Views. J Med Internet Res. 2017 Feb 14;19(2):e30 Authors: Spencer-Hughes V, Syred J, Allison A, Holdsworth G, Baraitser P Abstract BACKGROUND: Sexual health services routinely screen for child sexual exploitation (CSE). Although sexual health services are increasingly provided online, there has been no research on the translation of the safeguarding function to online services. We studied expert practitioner views on safeguarding in this context. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to document expert practitioner views on safeguarding in the context of an online sexual health service. METHODS: We conducted semistructured interviews with lead professionals purposively sampled from local, regional, or national organizations with a direct influence over CSE protocols, child protection policies, and sexual health services. Interviews were analyzed by three researchers using a matrix-based analytic method. RESULTS: Our respondents described two different approaches to safeguarding. The "information-providing" approach considers that young people experiencing CSE will ask for help when they are ready from someone they trust. The primary function of the service is to provide information, provoke reflection, generate trust, and respond reliably to disclosure. The approach values online services as an anonymous space to test out disclosure without commitment. The "information-gathering" approach considers that young people may withhold information about exploitation. Therefore, services should seek out information to assess risk and initiate disclosure. This approach values face-to-face opportunities for individualized questioning and immediate referral. CONCLUSIONS: The information-providing approach is associated with confidential telephone support lines and the information-gathering approach with clinical services. The approach adopted online will depend on ethos and the range of services provided. Effective transition from online to clinic services after disclosure is an essential element of this process and further research is needed to understand and support this transition. PMID: 28196790 [PubMed - in process]

Child sexual abuse and exploitation-A global glimpse.

Related Articles
Child sexual abuse and exploitation-A global glimpse. Child Abuse Negl. 2017 Feb 22;: Authors: Dubowitz H Abstract The view of what constitutes child abuse and neglect is dependent on the laws, cultural context, local thresholds and the availability. Since 1982, the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN) has conducted surveillance of child maltreatment and child protection every two years, published in World Perspectives on Child Abuse. It is hoped that up to date information will inform the development of laws, policies and programs to better address child abuse and neglect. This article is based on data on child sexual abuse and exploitation from 73 countries gathered online in 2015-16 for the 12 edition of World Perspectives. Respondents were key informants who were knowledgeable professionals in the child protection field. They were encouraged to consult with colleagues so as to provide accurate information. Countries were grouped into different regions of the world and into income level categories. The findings focus on definitions of abuse and neglect, laws, policies and programs to address and prevent maltreatment and barriers to prevention. It is evident that there is considerable variability across regions and country income categories, and that programs and services need to be considerably strengthened, even in high income countries. PMID: 28237191 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Maltreatment Risk Among Children With Disabilities.

Related Articles
Maltreatment Risk Among Children With Disabilities. Pediatrics. 2017 Mar 06;: Authors: Maclean MJ, Sims S, Bower C, Leonard H, Stanley FJ, O'Donnell M Abstract BACKGROUND: Children with disabilities are at increased risk of child maltreatment; however, there is a gap in the evidence about whether all disabilities are at equal risk and whether risk factors vary according to the type of disability. METHODS: A population-based record-linkage study of all children born in Western Australia between 1990 and 2010. Children with disabilities were identified by using population-based registers and risk of maltreatment determined by allegations reported to the Department for Child Protection and Family Support. RESULTS: Although children with disabilities make up 10.4% of the population, they represent 25.9% of children with a maltreatment allegation and 29.0% of those with a substantiated allegation; however, increased risk of maltreatment was not consistent across all disability types. Children with intellectual disability, mental/behavioral problems, and conduct disorder continued to have increased risk of an allegation and substantiated allegation after adjusting for child, family, and neighborhood risk factors. In contrast, adjusting for these factors resulted in children with autism having a lower risk, and children with Down syndrome and birth defects/cerebral palsy having the same risk as children without disability. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of disabilities in the child protection system suggests a need for awareness of the scope of issues faced by these children and the need for interagency collaboration to ensure children's complex needs are met. Supports are needed for families with children with disabilities to assist in meeting the child's health and developmental needs, but also to support the parents in managing the often more complex parenting environment. PMID: 28264988 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Frenotomy for tongue-tie in newborn infants

Cochrane library logo

Authors: O'Shea JE, Foster JP, O'Donnell CPF, Breathnach D, Jacobs SE, Todd DA, Davis PG.

Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2017, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD011065. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011065.pub2.